At the 2022 Annual Conference & 50th Anniversary Celebration, we want to equip you with the tools you need to deliver the most current, inclusive, and well-rounded care to your clients while helping to pave the way towards a healthier, client-centered future. We want to help you help others!

The 2022 Annual Conference & 50th Anniversary Celebration will feature six interactive keynote sessions, 60 immersive breakout sessions across ten subject tracks, an engaging panel discussion on the Peer Recovery movement, a live Q&A with NAADAC leadership, an exhibit hall, poster presentations, special events, networking opportunities, pre and post-conference sessions, and so much more!

Register Now!

Friday, October 7, 2022 - 7 CEs

7:00am - 8:00pm Registration
8:30am – 5:00pm PRE-CONFERENCE SESSIONS (7 CES EACH)

Lunch break TBD

(Meals are not provided by NAADAC for post-conference sessions.)

4:00pm – 6:00pm Minority Fellowship Program for Addictions Counselors (MFP-AC) Orientation (closed session)
5:30PM – 8:00pm NAADAC BOOKSTORE Open
6:00pm – 8:00pm 50th Anniversary WELCOME Reception in the Exhibit Hall 
9:00pm – 10:00pm Mutual Support Meeting

Saturday, October 8, 2022 - 8.5 CEs

7:00am – 4:15pm Registration
7:00am – 8:00am Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
7:00am – 4:15pm Poster Presentations & Exhibit Hall Open
7:30AM – 7:00PM NAADAC BOOKSTORE OPEN
8:00am - 9:00am opening session (1 CE)

Welcome & State of NAADAC, presented by Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LAC, MAC, SAP, and Cynthia Moreno Tuohy, BSW, NCAC II, CDC III, SAP

9:00am - 10:15am morning keynote session (1.25 CEs)

Progressing Forward in Relapse Prevention: Dealing with Stigma, presented by Samson Teklemariam, LPC, CPTM

10:15am - 10:45am Morning Break in Exhibit Hall
10:45am - 12:15am breakout sessions (1.5 CEs each)
  • Be the One, Save Someone with Naloxone: A Bystander Intervention for Opioid Reversal, presented by Susie Mullens, MS, LPC, AADC-S, and Susan Bissett, PhD
     
  • The Effective Use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) with Substance Use Clients, presented by Christopher Shea, MA, CRAT, CAC-AD, LCC
     
  • Empowering Families to Build Recovery Capital for Sustained Recovery and Family Well-Being, presented by Kirstin Frescoln, PhD, CPM, and Al Falcon, MS, LCPC, LAC
     
  • Healing Trauma in the Path of Recovery, presented by Rafael Cortina, LMFT
     
  • Preparing for Risk in Behavioral Health Care – HR May Be the Highest Risk!, presented by Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC
     
  • Assessments, Interventions, and Treatments for Problematic Sexual Behavior, presented by Dalanna Burris, MS, LPC-A, LCDC, CSAT
     
  • Language Matters – Working with Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders, presented by Dawnia Flonnoy, MA, and Elizabeth Bullock, BA
     
  • Supporting Recovery: Who's Who at the Zoo?, presented by Randy Anderson, RCP, LADC, CPRS-S
     
  • Digital Assessments for Predicting Patient Success, Personalizing Care Plans, & Measuring Outcomes, presented by Evian Gordon, MD, PhD
     
  • Now That You Know It... How Do You Do It?, presented by Kathy Elson, MS, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS, MAC, SAP
12:15pm - 2:15pm Lunch in Exhibit Hall
2:15pm - 3:45pm breakout sessions (1.5 Ces each)
  • Better Brain Condition = Better Treatment Response = Better Outcomes, presented by Judi Kosterman, EdD, Jordan Scott, Certified Neuro-Tech, and Robin Rudnikoff
     
  • Dying to Connect: Addiction as an Attachment Disorder, presented by Ellen Elliot, PhD, LCAS, LCMHC, CSAT
     
  • Family-Centered Approach for Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders, presented by Kimberly-Ann Coe, BSW, and Brian Southworth, MSW
     
  • Untangling Meth, Sex, and Intimacy: Skills for Clinical Practice, presented by David Fawcett, PhD, LCSW, CSAT
     
  • Developing Staff, Engaging Patients, presented by Christopher Yadron, PhD, LCPC, CADC
     
  • Compulsive Sexual and Love Behavior: Etiology and Culturally-Responsive Treatment for Sex Addiction, presented by Cortny Stark, PhD, LPC, LAC, LPCC
     
  • Sex, Drugs, and Generational Trauma: Assessment and Treatment Planning with LGBTQIA+ Folks, presented by Evan Rosenthal, LPCC, LADC, LPC
     
  • Navigating a Pathway of Recovery: One Click at a Time, presented by Marisa Barbieri, MSC, and Dawn Wilkin, CPS
     
  • Using Technology to Treat Substance Use Disorder, presented by Elliott Liebling, MPH, and Jeffrey Cummis, MA
     
  • Building an International Drug Demand Reduction Workforce, presented by Joanna Travis-Roberts, MA, and Becky Vaughn, MSEd
3:45pm - 4:15pm Afternoon Break in Exhibit Hall
4:15pm - 5:30pm AFTERNOON keynote session (1.25 ces)

The Counselor’s Guide to Addressing Medical Cannabis in Treatment Settings, presented by Aaron Norton, PhD

7:00pm - 9:00pm peer panel (2 ces)

The Peer Recovery Movement: A Continuing Conversation Panel, presented by Gerard J. Schmidt, MA, LPC, MAC, Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC, Joe Powell, LCDC, RSPS, PSS, Honesty Liller, CPRS, John Cates, MA, LCDC, Kyle Brewer, BS, PRPS, and Helen "Skip" Skipper

9:00pm – 10:00pm Mutual Support Meeting

Sunday, October 9, 2022 - 6 CEs

7:00am – 7:30Am Sunday religious Service Catholic & Nondenominational
7:30am – 4:00pm Registration
7:30AM – 5:00PM NAADAC Bookstore open
7:30am – 2:00pm Poster Presentations & Exhibit Hall Open
7:30am – 8:30am Continental Breakfast in exhibit hall
8:30am - 10:00am morning keynote session (1.5 ces)

Resilience in Healthcare Leadership: Practicing Self-Care to Prevent Burnout, presented by Amer Kaissi, PhD

10:00am - 10:30am Morning Break in Exhibit Hall
10:30am - 12:00pm breakout sessions (1.5 ces each)
  • Recovery Status, Education, and 12-Step Adherence & SUD Counselors' Opiate Replacement Preferences, presented by Joseph Stanley, PhD, LAC, LPC
     
  • Addiction and Moral Injury, presented by Dorothy "Dottie" Greene, PhD, LCSW, LADAC II, QCS
     
  • Understanding the Neuroscience Behind Behavior, presented by Boni-Lou Roberts and Dana Malone-White, MSW, LCSW
     
  • Dialectic Tools: Treating Those with Co-occurring Substance Use and Personality Disorders, presented by Fredrick Dombrowski, PhD, LMHC, LADC, MAC
     
  • Triple Threat: How Lawsuits, the Government, and You Can Combat Insurance Discrimination, presented by Caroline Reynolds, JD, MA, Jason Cowart, JD, and David Lloyd
     
  • Dying on the Hamster Wheel: Understanding Compulsive Work From an Attachment Perspective, presented by Mary F. Gay, PhD, LPC
     
  • Stories of Our Ancestors: The Impact of Culture, Race, Trauma on Addictions, presented by Johnny Alexander, LICSW, ACSW, MAC, SAP
     
  • Developing a Framework for a Recovery-Oriented Workplace Culture, presented by MacKenzie Phillips, MPH, Sarah Shapiro, and Nicole Knight, PRS-S
  • Integrating a Robust Addictions Curriculum into a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Program, presented by Monica Himes, PhD, LCSW, CADC
12:00pm - 2:00pm lunch in exhibit hall
2:00pm - 3:30pm breakout sessions (1.5 ces each)
  • "The Reign of Pain is Mainly in the Brain" - Pain Reprocessing Therapy for Chronic Pain, presented by Mike Bricker, MS, NCAC II, CADC II, LPC
     
  • Recovery Resilience vs. Shame and Stigma: Necessary Innovations in Treating Substance Use Disorders, presented by Bob Weathers, PhD, CMHRS
     
  • Integrating the Language of the Nervous System into Recovery Support, presented by JF Benoist, CSAC
     
  • Preventing Deaths of Despair: Overdose, Suicide, and Alcohol Liver Disease, presented by Geoff Wilson, LCSW, LCADC
     
  • The Intersection of DEA, Opioids, and MAT, presented by Dennis Wichern
     
  • Loneliness, Jealousy, and Personality Functioning in Problematic Mobile Phone Use, presented by Errol Rodriguez, PhD, CRC, MAC
     
  • Reducing Recidivism: The Ethical Core of Human Rights, presented by Shannon Kratky, MS, LPC, LCDC, NCC, and Nancy Tamburo-Treviῆo, MA, MSW, LPC-S, LCDC
     
  • Sacred Circles, presented by Dawn Allred, LPC, MAC
     
  • Technology-Enabled Transformation to Enhance Treatment and Address the Addiction Crisis, presented by Rae Green, JD, MA, LPC, CAADC, Alec Green, and Paul Joiner
     
  • Academic Assessment and Evaluation in Addiction Counselor Education, presented by Roy Kammer, EdD, LADC, LPC, CPPR
3:30pm – 4:00pm Afternoon Break
4:00pm - 5:30pm AFTERNOON keynote session (1.5 ces)

It’s Time to Fully Integrate Medications and Addiction Recovery, presented by Marvin D. Seppala, MD, Robert L. DuPont, MD, and William White

7:00pm - 9:00pm NAADAC Education & Research Foundation (NERF) Auction
9:00pm – 10:00pm Mutual Support Meeting

Monday, October 10, 2022 - 6.5 CEs

7:30am – 4:15pm Registration
7:30AM – 4:15PM NAADAC Bookstore open
7:30am – 8:30am Continental Breakfast in exhibit hall
8:00am - 8:30am naadac leadership Q&A (0.5 ces)

Q&A with NAADAC President & Executive Director, with Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LAC, MAC, SAP, and Cynthia Moreno Tuohy, BSW, NCAC II, CDC III, SAP

8:30am - 10:00am MORNING keynote session (1.5 ces)

Federal Panelpresented by Nora D. Volkow, MD, Miriam E. Delphin-Rittmon, PhD, and Rahul Gupta, MD, MPH, MBA, FACP

10:00am - 10:30am Morning break
10:30am - 12:00pm breakout sessions (1.5 ces each)
  • Factors for a Proposed Grand Unified Theory of Addiction and Recovery, presented by Jeff Sandoz, PhD, LMHC, MAP, ICADC, and Richard (Rick) Paul Green III, BSBA, LCDC
     
  • Treatment: The Emotions at the Heart of Addiction, presented by Ken J. Martz, PsyD, MBA
     
  • Invisible Loyalties: Uncovering the Transgenerational Impact of Addiction, presented by Aaron Olson, LCMHC, SUDC
     
  • Understanding the Beauty Behind Distraction: ADHD and SUD, presented by Samson Teklemariam, LPC, CPTM
     
  • Clinical Supervision in the New Age, presented by Dan Bizjak, MSW, LCSW, ICS, CSAC
     
  • Pornography Addiction: A Mirage of Intimacy, presented by Rommel Johnson, PhD, LPC, CAADC, CRC
     
  • Practice Standards for Older Adults: Preliminary Directions, presented by Keith Morgen, LPC, ACS
     
  • Enhancing Peer Support: Harnessing the Full Potential of People with Lived Experiences, presented by Katie Mayeda, LCSW
     
  • Best Practices in Technology-Enabled Peer Recovery Support, presented by Jon Dower, ICADC, CCS, SAP, CIP, Dan McCawley, ICPR, CIP, and Caitlyn Larson, BSN, RN, MBA
     
  • Addiction Education and the Law: Protecting Yourself, Your University, and Your Students, presented by John Korkow, LAC, SAP, PhD
12:00pm - 12:15pm break
12:15pm - 2:00pm 50th Anniversary Celebratory Awards Luncheon
2:00pm - 2:15pm break
2:15pm - 3:45pm breakout sessions (1.5 ces each)
  • Medication-Assisted Treatment Basics and Beyond, presented by Brian Russ, PhD, LMHC, NCC, DCMHS, and Bruce Baker, MD, CMRO, ABAM
     
  • A Skydiver’s View of Reality Therapy in Action, presented by Bob Wubbolding, EdD, RTC, LPCC
     
  • Expanding Access to Care - Recovery Rapid Response and Mobile Crisis Service Programs, presented by Denise Dickerson, MS, LCADC, LCPC, and Jason Phelan, BA
     
  • Surviving A Loss: Uncovering Grief's Role in Recovery, presented by Gigi Veasey, LCSW, LISAC, CCBT
     
  • Patient Retention: How to Keep Those You Have and Bring More In, presented by Kristyn Graham, PhD
     
  • Preventing and Treating Problem Gambling: Findings and Recommendations From a Statewide Assessment, presented by Hannah Carliner, ScD, MPH, Jim Wilkerson, LCPC, and Allyson Auerbach, MPH
     
  • Antiracist Addiction Treatment Requires Decriminalization and Harm Reduction, presented by Sandy Gibson, PhD, LCSW, LCADC
     
  • Trauma-Informed Peer Support Interactive Session, presented by Candace Alley, NCCPSS, CADC I, CPRC, CPTP
     
  • Ready to Change: A Review of Treatment and Technological Modifications Subsequent to the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Delivery of Medication Assisted Treatment, presented by Latonya Lee-Niang, EdD, LCADC, CCS, SAP
     
  • Making the Neurobiology of Addiction More Accessible to Students, presented by John Paulson, LCSW, LCAC, MAC, NCSE, and Kelsey Teel
3:45pm - 4:15pm afternoon break
4:15pm - 5:45pm AFTERNOON KEYNOTE & CLOSING CEREMONY(1.5 ces)

SOCIOMETRICS: Resilience Building Processes in Working with Trauma and Addiction, presented by Tian Dayton, PhD

9:00pm – 10:00pm Mutual Support Meeting

Tuesday, October 11, 2022 - 7 CEs

7:00am – 11:00am Registration
8:15am – 5:30pm Post-CONFERENCE SESSIONS (7 CEs each)
12:00pm – 1:45pm Lunch break

(Meals are not provided by NAADAC for post-conference sessions.)

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 7 CEs

8:15am – 5:30pm Post-CONFERENCE SESSIONS (7 CEs each)
12:00pm – 1:45pm Lunch break

(Meals are not provided by NAADAC for post-conference sessions.)


The 2022 Annual Conference & 50th Anniversary Celebration will feature training sessions within the following ten subject tracks:

Practice Management, Administration/Operation

These presentations cover certification/licensure, patient retention, billing/insurance, policy/regulatory issues, insurance/medicaid reimbursement, and ethical, legal, and liability issues.

  • KEYNOTE: Resilience in Healthcare Leadership: Practicing Self-Care to Prevent Burnoutpresented by Amer Kaissi, PhD

The recent COVID pandemic has magnified the chronic stressors that professionals deal with, thus increasing the likelihood of burnout. This talk argues that leaders and providers have the ability to influence and impact their team's and organization's resilience through their words and actions. But in order to do that, leaders and providers have to build and maintain their own self-resilience first. Drawing on the latest research and compelling case studies based on his executive coaching experience, Dr. Kaissi will propose a practical model of resilience that he uses with his leaders all over the country. This evidence-based model focuses on the importance of optimism, compassion and gratitude on the one hand, and self-care behaviors such as short reflections; strategic breaks; realistic boundaries between work and personal lives; and healthy sleep habits on the other. Supported by real-life case studies and interviews, this talk is based on the speaker's recently published book, Humbitious: The Power of Low-Ego, High-Drive Leadership, and focuses on tangible take-home behaviors that professionals can implement immediately.

  • KEYNOTE: Federal Update with ONDCP, NIDA, & SAMHSApresented by Nora D. Volkow, MD, Miriam E. Delphin-Rittmon, PhD, and Rahul Gupta, MD, MPH, MBA, FACP

Description coming soon...

  • BREAKOUT: Preparing for Risk in Behavioral Health Care – HR May Be the Highest Risk!, presented by Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC

It is not uncommon for clinical and administrative staff to aspire to leadership positions – program director, chief of operations, chief of compliance, human resources (HR) director, executive director/CEO, or similar roles and responsibilities. College courses and majors along with workshops, seminars, webinars, books, and other educational tools are used to help prepare for the ever-changing area of managing and leading people. Is human resources and the managing of people the high-risk venture in behavioral healthcare? Many assume it is clinical work. This workshop will focus on HR using real examples of the breadth of issues that may arise at any time. Emphasis will be on the need to be attuned to legal precedents and the regulatory environment throughout the employment processes.

  • BREAKOUT: Developing Staff, Engaging Patients, presented by Christopher Yadron, PhD, LCPC, CADC

The professional development and supervision of clinical staff is most effective when practiced in the context of active attempts to increase patient engagement and offer the best opportunity for recovery. This presentation will highlight the synergistic application of an events-based model of supervision combined with motivational interviewing practice to professionally develop clinicians and reduce premature treatment termination by clients. The content of the presentation is derived from research literature that is applied to case examples of group supervision conducted with counselors who are dedicated to helping their patients remain engaged and experience successful outcomes in recovery.

  • BREAKOUT: Triple Threat: How Lawsuits, the Government, and You Can Combat Insurance Discriminationpresented by Caroline Reynolds, JD, MA, Jason Cowart, JD, and David Lloyd

Equitable coverage for mental health and substance use disorder treatments cannot be achieved without first ending insurers’ discriminatory policies, which fuel systematic coverage denials and provider underpayment, and preserve anemic networks. Recent lawsuits have challenged many of these policies, empowering patients and counselors to force insurers to address inadequate coverage related to residential treatment, eating disorders, and more. And yet, these companies continue to flout their legal responsibilities, making it clear that solving the problem will require sustained legal action and effective regulation and enforcement. The attorneys behind the landmark Wit v. UBH case and a behavioral health policy expert will discuss parity laws, examine the enforcement challenges, and share how lawsuits can be used to hold insurers accountable and provide a roadmap to achieving parity.

  • BREAKOUT: The Intersection of DEA, Opioids, and MATpresented by Dennis Wichern

As a result of the opioid crisis, more and more primary care providers are being asked to treat those suffering from opioid use disorder (OUD) through the use of medication assisted treatment (MAT). This course will provide an in-depth review linking DEA’s, FDA’s, and SAMHSA’s authority and history as it relates to MAT and OTP’s along with national studies, risk mitigation strategies, patient limits, common red flags, criminal and civil case studies, emerging drugs of concern, common DEA and MAT FAQ’s, MAT practice safeguards, and more. The goal of the course is to empower and educate providers with the most current information available linking OUD, DEA, SAMHSA, and federal law to increase the number of MAT providers nationwide which remains at around six percent.

  • BREAKOUT: Clinical Supervision in the New Agepresented by Dan Bizjak, MSW, LCSW, ICS, CSAC

The relationship between a counselor and clinical supervisor is a driving factor in retention, progression, and success of our staff/supervisees. This workshop goes beyond the basics of how to become a clinical supervisor and discusses topics that are not discussed in school. With humor filled and interactive discussion, the generational gap is presented and outlined to identify methods of how to support “new school” and “old school” staff currently working within our workforce, specifically within the areas of addiction and mental health.

  • BREAKOUT: Patient Retention: How to Keep Those You Have and Bring More Inpresented by Kristyn Graham, PhD

Patient retention and success is a concern for any helping agency. This presentation will be a lecture/discussion to help all members in an organization recognize where changes can be made and identify little adjustments to improve retention, referrals, and success of patients and the organization. The process from the moment of first contact through the completion of programs will be discussed. The following are some of the sub-topics to be discussed: contact and scheduling, office presentation, organizational philosophy, treatment philosophy, program offerings and program assignment, group sessions, and clinical supervision and how it impacts patient retention.

Technology

These presentations cover Health Information Technology (HIT), Electronic Health Records (EHR), social media, teletherapy, and anything else technology related.

  • BREAKOUT: Digital Assessments for Predicting Patient Success, Personalizing Care Plans, & Measuring Outcomespresented by Evian Gordon, MD, PhD

Treatment for mental health disorders, including substance use disorders, often lacks personalized care plans, is discontinuous, and lacks evidence-based outcomes. Dr. Evian Gordon will show how digital tools can be used to assess brain function, screen for risk of mental health conditions, and regularly assess stress levels to support mental health and substance use disorder recovery. Dr. Gordon will show how assessment data can be used to recommend personalized care plans, clinical interventions, digital brain training regimens, and how the data can enable the tracking of evidence-based outcomes. Providers in attendance will learn how this innovative technology works, how they and their constituents can benefit from its use, and hear from providers who are using it today.

  • BREAKOUT: Using Technology to Treat Substance Use Disorderpresented by Elliott Liebling, MPH, and Jeffrey Cummis, MA

How can technology facilitate effective care for those with SUD? Researchers from RWJBarnabas Health’s Institute for Prevention and Recovery (IFPR) and Epic Together team will explore how tailored technology platforms and tools can improve access to SUD care, advance recovery support, and reduce SUD stigma through better patient identification, staff response times, and connection to community resources. Using IFPR’s Peer Recovery Program as a case study, the presenters will outline technology advances that have improved the care delivery process, from automatic electronic health record triggers that identify patients who may need support based on qualifying criteria to a HIPAA-compliant mobile app that allows staff to receive, respond to, and document patient data in real time.

  • BREAKOUT: Technology-Enabled Transformation to Enhance Treatment and Address the Addiction Crisispresented by Rae Green, JD, MA, LPC, CAADC, Alec Green, and Paul Joiner

The alarming rise in substance use disorder (SUD) cases has put a strain on behavioral healthcare infrastructure. To address the crisis, providers must expand their services along the continuum of care, improve financial efficiencies through diversified reimbursement options, and increase clinical capacity. Pressure to meet increased demand for treatment has driven rapid change for Sanford Behavioral Health (SBH). In this case study presentation, SBH’s founder, managing director, and its EHR partner review the organization’s clinical and operational transformation as well as how key technologies have made these advances possible. SBH’s emphasis on usability and workflow in implementing their technology resulted in overall improvement in every aspect of their practice environment.

  • BREAKOUT: Best Practices in Technology-Enabled Peer Recovery Supportpresented by Jon Dower, ICADC, CCS, SAP, CIP, Dan McCawley, ICPR, CIP, and Caitlyn Larson, BSN, RN, MBA

As we adjusted to life during the pandemic, many people in recovery for a substance use disorder (SUD) lost access to services. Studies show that peer support is essential to long-term recovery and can be supported by technology to bridge gaps of isolation and social networks. In this presentation, we’ll discuss how technology connects individuals to peer support, even in isolating circumstances; how peer support and technology can be integrated into sober living residences; using technology to meet patients where they are, including the moments of crisis when they are not with a healthcare provider; and considerations for special populations, such as rural areas, women and children, and justice-referred populations.

  • BREAKOUT: Ready to Change: A Review of Treatment and Technological Modifications Subsequent to the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Delivery of Medication Assisted Treatmentpresented by Latonya Lee-Niang, EdD, LCADC, CCS, SAP

The purpose of the presentation is to provide an analysis of evidence-based practice protocols for the implementation of a medication assisted treatment program. The presentation will focus on the implementation of office-based, non-physician owned (OBOT) programs that provide Buprenorphine and Naloxone. Utilizing the Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP 43) as a baseline for best practice information, this presentation will review research published since the onset of the pandemic that highlights treatment considerations and outcomes. The goal of the presentation is to highlight technical tools and advances that support the increased quality of services that have been modified due to the pandemic but continue to meet best practice standards.

Co-occurring Disorders

These presentations cover integrated treatment, DSM-5, mental health disorders, trauma informed care, and ICD 10.

  • BREAKOUT: Healing Trauma in the Path of Recoverypresented by Rafael Cortina, LMFT

Traumatic childhood and life events shape the way an individual sees themselves and the world, which has an impact on relationships, self-perception, coping skills, and self-esteem. Unfortunately, a common and initially effective way of managing the impact of trauma and adjusting to the world is through compulsive behaviors. They provide temporary relief and anesthetize emotional and relational pain. The focus of this presentation is to provide an understanding of the relationship between addiction and trauma, the role of the nervous system, adverse childhood experiences, polyvagal theory, and the application of this knowledge through the framework of Gestalt/relational approach to support healing.

  • BREAKOUT: Untangling Meth, Sex, and Intimacy: Skills for Clinical Practicepresented by David Fawcett, PhD, LCSW, CSAT

​​​​​​​Methamphetamine is increasingly used in conjunction with other drugs (chemsex) to intensify sexual encounters. Meth heightens sexual desire while numbing negative emotions and lowering inhibitions about sex and intimacy. Ultimately, meth hijacks sexual arousal and fuses sexual behavior with an intoxicated drug state, resulting in a persistent loss of sexual arousal. Meth’s damage to the dopamine transport system requires nearly two years to heal, creating long-term impulsivity, drug cravings, and anhedonia. These features require specialized clinical approaches to help meth-using clients address relapse risk, manage mood, and promote their sexual recovery. This workshop explores these issues and presents clinical strategies to assist clients develop healthy, drug-free sex and intimacy.

  • BREAKOUT: Dialectic Tools: Treating Those With Co-occurring Substance Use and Personality Disorderspresented by Fredrick Dombrowski, PhD, LMHC, LADC, MAC

Difficulties associated with personality disorders can complicate treatment of those in recovery from substances. Many clients living with co-occurring disorders may not be linked with appropriate treatment for personality disorders. The severity of interpersonal symptoms can potentially negatively impact other clients receiving treatment as well as the treatment team. This presentation will provide clinical tools for counselors to manage and support client’s living with co-occurring substance use and personality disorders. Participants will be able to identify skills to respond to clients in recovery who experience emotional dysregulation. Participants will also identify how to use these skills to enhance group substance use counseling.

  • BREAKOUT: Preventing Deaths of Despair: Overdose, Suicide, and Alcohol Liver Diseasepresented by Geoff Wilson, LCSW, LCADC

Surging death rates from suicide, drug overdoses, and alcoholism – what researchers refer to as "deaths of despair" – are largely responsible for a consecutive three-year decline of life expectancy in the U.S. This constitutes the first three-year drop in life expectancy in the U.S. since the years 1915–1918. This training will provide attendees with an in-depth review of what has led to the startling increase in deaths of despair in our country. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on deaths of despair will be highlighted. Effective strategies for reducing deaths of despair will be discussed, including specific clinical and social interventions.

  • BREAKOUT: Understanding the Beauty Behind Distraction: ADHD and SUDpresented by Samson Teklemariam, LPC, CPTM

One of the most challenging issues in treating substance use disorders is integrative treatment for co-occurring disorders. When a substance use disorder co-occurs with another mental health condition, the addiction professional must consider additional variables beyond substance use. Historically, attention deficient/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was a co-occurring condition assessed with adolescents, young adults, and maybe emerging adults. Inevitably, those adult patients in addiction treatment with ADHD were less likely to be assessed thoroughly or treated precisely. ADHD is not an adolescent-specific disorder. This presentation will highlight the beauty behind distraction and how instinctive distraction impulses can be leveraged to support recovery goals.

  • BREAKOUT: Surviving A Loss: Uncovering Grief's Role in Recoverypresented by Gigi Veasey, LCSW, LISAC, CCBT

Surviving a loss is an intentional process. Those who reach out for support create a solid foundation for understanding the many complex emotions that accompany grief. Those in recovery from a substance use disorder may be more vulnerable and grief can derail the recovery process. This presentation will help substance use disorder counselors identify grief and loss issues and help clients and their families who may feel stuck or overwhelmed move through the grief process. I will share a therapeutic process, The Five Written Expressions of Grief (TM), that can help create hope and promote healing.

Psychopharmacology, Medication-Assisted Treatment, Pharmacotherapy, or Advanced SUD-Specific Treatment

These presentations cover the neurobiology of addiction, pharmacotherapy/medication-assisted treatment, opioids, alcohol, marijuana, sedatives, stimulants, synthetic drugs, tobacco/nicotine, and designer drugs.

  • KEYNOTE: The Counselor’s Guide to Addressing Medical Cannabis in Treatment Settingspresented by Aaron Norton, PhD

In the United States, medical cannabis is now broadly or partially legalized in 43 states, though it remains illegal under federal law. Variation in state and local laws, confusing and contradictory research, and an increase in clients presenting with medical cannabis cards pose challenges for addictions counselors. Counselors aren’t physicians who can advise clients on medication, yet we are addictions professionals tasked with treating substance use disorders. How do we accomplish this task while still making room for clients suffering from debilitating biomedical conditions who might benefit from medical cannabis? This training was designed to provide counselors with a decision tree for choosing an appropriate course of action when working with clients presenting with medical cannabis cards.

  • KEYNOTE: It’s Time to Fully Integrate Medications and Addiction Recoverypresented by Marvin D. Seppala, MD, Robert L. DuPont, MD, and William White

It’s time to cross the clinical chasm and fully integrate medications and other means of supporting addiction recovery. We will explore the benefits of integrating medications, psychotherapies and psychosocial support services in the treatment of SUDs. The addiction field is divided by counterproductive biases that limit integration of evidence-based practices. This primarily occurs in the 12 Step, abstinence-based versus medication arguments that divide clinicians and undermine patient outcomes. We will identify historical factors contributing to these biases, reveal limitations of singular treatments, describe the benefits of integration and provide means of integrating treatments to improve patient outcomes. Our vision: every person seeking help for SUDs will have access to a comprehensive menu of evidence-supported treatment and recovery support options.

  • BREAKOUT: Be the One, Save Someone with Naloxone: A Bystander Intervention for Opioid Reversalpresented by Susie Mullens, MS, LPC, AADC-S, and Susan Bissett, PhD

The West Virginia Collegiate Recovery Network (WVCRN) and West Virginia Drug Intervention Institute (WVDII) have created “Be The One, Save Someone” utilizing a bystander intervention approach. The campaign utilizes multimedia and is multifaceted. It includes in-person and virtual live naloxone training, an asynchronous naloxone training, an ally training, and the centerpiece, “One Box.” The One Box is a self-contained kit that includes everything needed for a bystander to save a life when an opioid overdose is suspected. The contents include two doses of naloxone, a rescue breathing mask, sterile gloves, and written and video step by step instructions for naloxone administration. Over 50,000 students have access to the resources needed to save a life as a result of this initiative.

  • BREAKOUT: Better Brain Condition = Better Treatment Response = Better Outcomespresented by Judi Kosterman, EdD, Jordan Scott, Certified Neuro-Tech, and Robin Rudnikoff

Panelists speaking from their experiences as national policy advisor, treatment provider, neuro-technician, and patient will share their points of view on the efficacy of the non-pharma, non-invasive, medical protocol ElectroMagnetic Brain Pulse (EMBP) therapy as a concomitant treatment to evidence-based behavioral health therapies. From its first use within DOD to its current availability to civilian patients in the private sector, EMBP is improving outcomes in the treatment of SUD and co-occurring mental health disorders as it improves the physiological condition of the brain and, therefore, a patient’s readiness and receptivity to behavioral health therapies. The data from research as well as patients’ clinical outcomes will be discussed.

  • BREAKOUT: Recovery Status, Education, and 12-Step Adherence & SUD Counselors' Opiate Replacement Preferencespresented by Joseph Stanley, PhD, LAC, LPC

This presentation will discuss recent research on the effect of SUD counselor education level, recovery status, and level of adherence to 12 Step principles on their preferences regarding opiate agonist therapy for opioid use disorder. The research used multiple logistic regression modeling and found significant correlation between the education level, recovery status, and 12 Step adherence, individually and in combination, and SUD counselors opioid replacement therapy preferences. The results suggest that increased attention to biopsychosocial models of SUD etiology and treatment and standardization of education and training requirements may increase counselor support of MAT.

  • BREAKOUT: "The Reign of Pain is Mainly in the Brain" - Pain Reprocessing Therapy for Chronic Painpresented by Mike Bricker, MS, NCAC II, CADC II, LPC

We tend to think of chronic pain treatment as a medical problem for the physician’s office. However, the depression, anxiety, stress, and pre-morbid trauma that haunt these patients could – and perhaps should – bring them to our offices. Moreover, management of pain is a major challenge for persons with substance use disorders, and the effects of intractable chronic pain on personality development lead to increased depression, anxiety, and learned helplessness. Many clinicians did not receive training in these complex areas, but a new EBP is available. We will explore Pain Reprocessing Therapy, a new research-based intervention for chronic and neuroplastic pain.

  • BREAKOUT: Factors for a Proposed Grand Unified Theory of Addiction and Recoverypresented by Jeff Sandoz, PhD, LMHC, MAP, ICADC, and Richard (Rick) Paul Green III, BSBA, LCDC

For years, there has been a lag between theories and their practical application in the field of addiction and recovery. As such, addiction specialists and academicians have felt fragmented, divided, and disconnected. Now is the time to examine an emerging synthesis of factors that are promoting a rapid paradigm shift in understanding. This presentation explores the diverse elements of genetics, trauma and emotional attachment, learning (the effects of alcohol/drugs), brain development, neurotransmitter imbalance, and epigenetic changes. Other topics include spiritual experience and recovery as a rite of passage.

  • BREAKOUT: Medication-Assisted Treatment Basics and Beyondpresented by Brian Russ, PhD, LMHC, NCC, DCMHS, and Bruce Baker, MD, CMRO, ABAM

This presentation will provide new addiction professionals with an introduction to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD). Drawing on their combined expertise in addictionology and behavioral health counseling, the presenters will discuss OUD and MAT while highlighting current trends in the opioid epidemic. Attendees will receive information on the primary MAT medications, including methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone. A review of the evidenced-based behavioral therapies and a discussion of recent innovations, including the use of telehealth, neurofeedback, and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) within MAT, will conclude the presentation.

Clinical Skills

These presentations cover evidence-based practices, case studies, relapse prevention, treatment planning, screening & assessment, counseling theories and practice methods, the ASAM Criteria, substance use prevention, and promising practices.

  • KEYNOTE: SOCIOMETRICS: Resilience Building Processes in Working with Trauma and Addictionpresented by Tian Dayton, PhD

The research in neuropsychology has officially ended the era of talking heads and brought the body into the therapeutic room as a full and necessary part of the healing equation. Psychodrama, the first form of embodied therapy and sociometry and an early theory of group dynamics, allow the body as well as the mind to have a voice and participate in the healing milieu. Based on Dr. Dayton’s recent book on Sociometrics, this presentation will discuss user-friendly, experiential processes that engage and bond groups, organically moving participants from states of dysregulation to self and co-regulation. Sociometrics activate the social engagement system in service of healing; they incorporate the research on recovering from PTSD into a lively format that gets people on their feet, connecting to their own inner world and sharing with each other in authentic ways. Sociometrics are easy to learn, reduce the role of the therapist, and enhance and empower group members to become stakeholders in their own recovery. Sociometrics build emotional literacy, intelligence and resilience through structured, interactive “experiences" that feel welcoming, safe, moving and, at times, even playful. Sociometrics break down the categories of healing into manageable parts through processes such as floor check and timelines that are experiential and can warm clients up to focused, embodied role plays.

  • BREAKOUT: The Effective Use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) with Substance Use Clientspresented by Christopher Shea, MA, CRAT, CAC-AD, LCC

Research and evidence demonstrate cognitive behavioral therapy's (CBT) effectiveness in treating substance use and relapse remediation. This session revisits the use of CBT coupled with our current understanding of substance use disorders, advances in medicine, and over 50 years of CBT practice. The session will examine the complex interaction and impact of trauma experiences on the origin and continuation of one's substance use disorder. The philosophical discussion of our existential meaning of life will deepen the participants' understanding of why people behave as they do, while reinforcing the concept of "hope" as necessary to help maintain motivation for the continuation of one's recovery process.

  • BREAKOUT: Dying to Connect: Addiction as an Attachment Disorderpresented by Ellen Elliot, PhD, LCAS, LCMHC, CSAT

Addiction counseling has changed drastically over the years as the field has widened to include a merging of theoretical concepts. As the addictions field makes room for a greater, deeper understanding of the addictive phenomenon, continued education changes the way we treat both chemical and behavioral addictions. This workshop will help addiction counselors better understand attachment styles and the significance of an individual’s attachment style when treating addictive disorders. Information will be presented about the dangers of isolation in treatment and how to help clients create the connecting opportunities necessary to heal attachment deficits and begin to live the fulfilling lives they long for.

  • BREAKOUT: Addiction and Moral Injurypresented by Dorothy "Dottie" Greene, PhD, LCSW, LADAC II, QCS

Moral Injury (MI) describes a phenomenon where individuals engage in behaviors that conflict with deeply held values. For example, an individual with severe substance use disorder who engages in sex work or theft to obtain money for drugs to prevent withdrawal. Under-acknowledged issues in addiction treatment are moral injuries that clients experience. Internalized shame resulting from MI is a risk factor for recurrence of use and, if left unhealed, sustained remission may be tentative. While MI is most associated with veterans, researchers are examining the construct in other contexts. In this session, MI is considered in the context of addiction treatment and recovery. Participants are introduced to MI screening tools, and the session concludes with therapeutic recommendations.

  • BREAKOUT: Recovery Resilience vs. Shame and Stigma: Necessary Innovations in Treating Substance Use Disorderspresented by Bob Weathers, PhD, CMHRS

Dr. Bob Weathers, University Educator and Recovery Coach, shares over 40 years of clinical experience and research on navigating recovery from substance use disorders while addressing barriers like personal shame and cultural stigma. Tying in principles and methods from his recent books (on Cambridge University Press) on “recovery resilience,” Dr. Weathers begins diagnostically with the nuanced physiological changes that occur in the substance-use-disordered brain. Next, he addresses resources and limitations inherent in early recovery. Finally, he incorporates cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness strategies, along with creative process and relational neuroscience, into a more advanced set of resources to aid in sustained and successful recovery.

  • BREAKOUT: Treatment: The Emotions at the Heart of Addictionpresented by Ken J. Martz, PsyD, MBA

Evidence-based practice is the standard of care, but is based on a percentage of success among groups of people studied. The art of psychotherapy is individualized, and so a more nuanced approach is needed on the day-to-day practice level. Often in school, we are taught a range of tools and techniques with various acronyms but are not taught the wisdom to select the ones needed in the proper timing for effectiveness. This will help to identify the role of emotions in the development, maintenance, and resolution of substance use disorder.

  • BREAKOUT: A Skydiver’s View of Reality Therapy in Actionpresented by Bob Wubbolding, EdD, RTC, LPCC

At first, a skydiver sees a general landscape and then gradually sees specifics. Participants will gain an overview of the WDEP System of Reality Therapy and how it applies to recovery. As the presentation develops, participants will witness a role play demonstration illustrating how to use reality therapy with challenging, resistant, and hostile clients. Brief small group discussions will allow participants to formulate observations and critiques of the counselor’s use of reality therapy. They will also receive several handouts that they may reproduce as well as the chart “Cycle of Counseling” (22nd Revision, 2023).

Cultural Humility & Demographic-Specific Treatment Issues

These presentations cover cultural humility, SUD and LGBTQ+, racial/ethnic groups, gender, spirituality, low-income/homeless, and veterans/military.

  • BREAKOUT: Language Matters – Working With Families Affected by Substance Use Disorderspresented by Dawnia Flonnoy, MA, and Elizabeth Bullock, BA

This session invites substance use disorder treatment professionals to consider how their thoughts, beliefs, and language regarding substance use influence interactions with individuals and their families. Language has the power to perpetuate or reverse harmful stereotypes. Stigma about substance use disorders affects the attitudes of healthcare and treatment professionals, creating barriers for parents to engage in treatment. This session will explore the history of language around substance use disorders and how language has perpetuated shame and blaming in a historical context. Participants will explore how language impacts their work with individuals and families affected by parental substance use, and strategies that can be used to move to a more inclusive, person-first approach.

  • BREAKOUT: Sex, Drugs, and Generational Trauma: Assessment and Treatment Planning with LGBTQIA+ Folkspresented by Evan Rosenthal, LPCC, LADC, LPC

For many years, substance use and sex have been two ways that LGBTQIA+ folks have found meaningful connections. Living authentically as an LGBTQIA+ person often involves feeling invisible, silent, proud, and empowered. The hurt and silencing through past decades of harm have created generational trauma that impacts LGBTQIA+ folks' physical, chemical, and mental health. We’ll use history, intersectionality, and the Minority Stress Model to conceptualize, assess, and develop treatment strategies for working with LGBTQIA+ clients.

  • BREAKOUT: Stories of Our Ancestors: The Impact of Culture, Race, Trauma on Addictionspresented by Johnny Alexander, LICSW, ACSW, MAC, SAP

Research on the impact trauma has on families and offspring goes back decades and includes trauma caused by war, genocide, class struggles, and racism. Helping professionals, such as psychologists, therapists, and other care experts, tend to lack the understanding that these kinds of traumas can have on patients with substance use disorders (SUD). This session examines the treatment of trauma based on cultural identity or race and includes strategies clinicians can use with patients with historical, international, or racial trauma to help patients build resilience in their recovery process.

  • BREAKOUT: Reducing Recidivism: The Ethical Core of Human Rightspresented by Shannon Kratky, MS, LPC, LCDC, NCC, and Nancy Tamburo-Treviῆo, MA, MSW, LPC-S, LCDC

The Risk-Need-Responsivity Model, first developed in the 1980s (Bonta & Andrews, 2007), identifies “criminogenic needs” of folks involved in the criminal justice system to predict and prevent recidivism through cognitive social learning theories of criminal conduct. This model conflicts with the elements of trauma-informed care (SAMHSA, 2014) by focusing on “antisocial” and “pro-criminal” characteristics. The Good Lives Model (Ward, 2004), however, is strengths-based and rooted in the ethical concepts of human dignity and universal human rights. Participants will learn how to shift the focus toward the humanness of folks who are involved in the criminal justice system by bringing attentional to internal values and priorities and external factors, such as resources and opportunities.

  • BREAKOUT: Practice Standards for Older Adults: Preliminary Directionspresented by Keith Morgen, LPC, ACS

Nearly one million adults aged 65 and older live with a substance use disorder (SUD). A growing body of literature underscores the challenges of treating older adult SUDs. For instance, older adults typically present with needs that are unique in counseling, SUD symptoms, co-occurring psychiatric and medical conditions, prevention, withdrawal management, healthcare insurance, and recovery-support. This presentation will provide an update on the work of the practice standards committee focused on these (and other) issues for older adult SUD care while also seeking input from attendees on what they feel is needed for crafting best practices for care.

  • BREAKOUT: Antiracist Addiction Treatment Requires Decriminalization and Harm Reductionpresented by Sandy Gibson, PhD, LCSW, LCADC

This presentation will explore changing treatment paradigms to reflect the shifting trend towards decriminalization and integration of harm reduction to effectively provide anti-racist addiction treatment. The goal of this presentation is to challenge our historical understanding of drug laws and compulsory treatment, and promote the transition of drug policy approaches from criminal justice to public health. This presentation will detail proposed legislation for decriminalization to promote the recognition of all people’s humanity and agency, expand access to non-compulsory services, reduce penalties, and redirect resources from a punitive criminal justice approach to a community informed, culturally competent, restorative intersectional/holistic public health approach.

Process Addictions

These presentations cover gambling addiction, sexual addiction, internet addiction, screen addiction, and others.

  • BREAKOUT: Assessments, Interventions, and Treatments for Problematic Sexual Behaviorpresented by Dalanna Burris, MS, LPC-A, LCDC, CSAT

This presentation will provide recent clinical data and research specific to the field of problematic sexual behavior. Basic, yet thorough, evidenced-based assessment tools to identify the presence of problematic sexual behavior will be reviewed. Additionally, this presentation will introduce and explore effective interventions for a spectrum of problematic sexual behaviors. Finally, treatment recommendations for individuals who present with problematic sexual behaviors will be addressed.

  • BREAKOUT: Compulsive Sexual and Love Behavior: Etiology and Culturally-Responsive Treatment for Sex Addictionpresented by Cortny Stark, PhD, LPC, LAC, LPCC

The pathology and treatment of “sex and love addiction,” or compulsive sexual or love behavior, remains a controversial topic. From the “perversion” of non-hetero/cis-normative sexual attraction and intimacy, to the pursuit of the inclusion of hypersexual disorder in the Diagnostics and Statistics Manual (DSM), the pathologization of compulsive sexual behavior persists. Although the last two editions of the DSM failed to include sex addiction as a diagnosis, researchers have identified common symptoms experienced by persons engaged in compulsive and impulsive sexual and love behavior. This presentation provides additional training regarding the etiology, and evidence-based culturally-responsive treatment modalities for clients/patients experiencing out-of-control sexual compulsions.

  • BREAKOUT: Dying on the Hamster Wheel: Understanding Compulsive Work From an Attachment Perspectivepresented by Mary F. Gay, PhD, LPC

Process addiction, like substance addiction, can be understood as an attempt at emotional regulation in the context of attachment theory. Compulsive work behaviors or "workaholism" may be considered a "hidden addiction" that cultural and societal systems often reward. This workshop will apply attachment theory to defining and treating compulsive work in individual and group settings.

  • BREAKOUT: Loneliness, Jealousy, and Personality Functioning in Problematic Mobile Phone Usepresented by Errol Rodriguez, PhD, CRC, MAC

Over the last decade, clinicians have reported an increase in anxiety, depression, distractibility, obsessiveness, and sleep disturbances that appear related to smartphone overuse. Some researchers reported that overuse might stem from a heightened need to stay connected with others and informed in real-time about what others are doing. Smartphone overuse and its pattern of symptoms bare striking resemblance to other impulse/compulsive use conditions such as substance use disorders and behavioral addictions. These conditions often raise questions about its compulsive nature, whether it is rooted in attachment and personality, and to what extent loneliness and jealousy play a role. This presentation will report on our research findings and discuss implications for clinical intervention.

  • BREAKOUT: Pornography Addiction: A Mirage of Intimacypresented by Rommel Johnson, PhD, LPC, CAADC, CRC

Problematic pornography use, also known as pornography addiction, has increasingly become widespread in the United States and countries around the world. Moreover, a growing body of evidence suggests an unprecedented increase in consumption of online pornography use during the COVID-19 pandemic, and possibly even directly caused by it (Hashir, et al, 2021; Grubbs et al, 2021). Pornography addiction has been shown to generally have a negative impact on relationships and individual health (Sills, 2018). This presentation will help SUD professionals understand the etiology, presentation, symptoms, and impact of problematic pornography use on individuals, couples, and families.

  • BREAKOUT: Preventing and Treating Problem Gambling: Findings and Recommendations From a Statewide Assessmentpresented by Hannah Carliner, ScD, MPH, Jim Wilkerson, LCPC, and Allyson Auerbach, MPH

This presentation with show findings from a statewide assessment of problem gambling conducted in Illinois in 2021. It will then describe the prevalence of gambling and problem gambling in different populations, the high rates of psychiatric and substance use comorbidities, rates of treatment-seeking and barriers, and attitudes about gambling. Discussion with Illinois state partners will cover how findings can inform a comprehensive statewide social determinants of health approach to problem gambling. Recommendations for key stakeholders are discussed related to prevention, identification and intervention, treatment, and recovery. Session participants are encouraged to contribute with examples from their own work in problem gambling or from public health approaches to other addictive disorders.

Recovery Support (Clinical)

These presentations cover community navigation, individual & community capital, family support, and treatment coordination.

  • KEYNOTE: Progressing Forward in Relapse Prevention: Dealing with Stigmapresented by Samson Teklemariam, LPC, CPTM

Substance use disorder (SUD) is most often defined as a chronic disease involving a common repeating cycle of abstinence and relapse. ‘Relapse’ refers to a return to a previous level of substance use after a period of considerable reduction or abstinence from substance use. It is common practice to communicate with patients that even when a person with SUD is in remission and no longer using substances, a relapse is always a possibility. Just as it is with every patient struggling with a chronic medical condition, the goal during an exacerbation is to restore the patient to stability and keep them motivated and connected to treatment. However, when helping professionals who are both providing care and in recovery themselves experience relapse, reactions vary. These reactions are often driven by negative stigma and impact treatment decisions for both professionals and patients in recovery.

  • BREAKOUT: Empowering Families to Build Recovery Capital for Sustained Recovery and Family Well-Beingpresented by Kirstin Frescoln, PhD, CPM, and Al Falcon, MS, LCPC, LAC

There is more to sustained recovery than negative drug tests, treatment attendance, and completion of services. Sustained recovery depends on all four of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s identified domains — health, home, purpose, and community. Recovery capital, or “the sum of personal and social resources at one’s disposal for managing drug dependence and bolstering one’s capacity and opportunities for recovery,” encompasses these domains. This session highlights research related to the role of recovery capital in sustaining individual recovery and family well-being, while discussing strategies that help parents, children, and families as a whole establish and expand their recovery capital.

  • BREAKOUT: Family-Centered Approach for Families Affected by Substance Use Disorderspresented by Kimberly-Ann Coe, BSW, and Brian Southworth, MSW

This session will highlight the essential ingredients required to successfully implement a family-centered approach and cover practical strategies, challenges, and successes from experts in the field. It will review the state and local leadership efforts needed, including priority setting, evaluation, and funding, to ensure the implementation and sustainability of a family-centered approach. A new series of companion modules developed by the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare will be featured during the presentation. These modules are designed for state, county, and agency-level collaborative partners working together to improve systems, services, and outcomes for children and families affected by substance use disorders.

  • BREAKOUT: Understanding the Neuroscience Behind Behaviorpresented by Boni-Lou Roberts and Dana Malone-White, MSW, LCSW

According to SAMHSA’s 2019-2020 National Survey on Substance Use, about 40.3 million people in the United States had a substance use disorder in the past year. Many of those who do use substances struggle with understanding the brain chemistry changes that occur with use and how that impacts their behavior. Participants in this training will gain knowledge for effective communication during psychoeducational process to help individuals they work with understand the impact substance use has on the brain and behavioral outcomes.

  • BREAKOUT: Integrating the Language of the Nervous System into Recovery Supportpresented by JF Benoist, CSAC

Oftentimes in therapy, a client’s body isn’t given the same attention their thoughts and emotions receive. Using “the language of the nervous system” bridges this gap by addressing the intelligence within the body, and using this information to help a client ground themselves. This session will give specific tools for how practitioners can integrate body-specific wellness tools into their sessions. This includes using body language and nonverbal cues to connect to hidden beliefs and using conscious breathing to self-regulate during and outside sessions.

  • BREAKOUT: Invisible Loyalties: Uncovering the Transgenerational Impact of Addictionpresented by Aaron Olson, LCMHC, SUDC

This workshop will assist clinicians, clients, and family members to recognize the insidious ways that the traumatic impact of addiction is unconsciously transmitted from one generation to the next.

  • BREAKOUT: Expanding Access to Care - Recovery Rapid Response and Mobile Crisis Service Programspresented by Denise Dickerson, MS, LCADC, LCPC, and Jason Phelan, BA

The Recovery Rapid Response (RRR) approach was developed to increase access to behavioral healthcare in underserved rural areas. With significant expansion of capacity in hours, days, and service availability including Buprenorphine based treatment, we have implemented a patient-centered treatment on demand model. This has been expanded to a mobile crisis team, which includes a medical practitioner, therapist, and peer specialist, that allows us to respond within our county. The RRR model has influenced our workflows within our clinics and their day-to-day operations. The RRR program has facilitated relationships with key stakeholders in our community, allowing for more appropriate referrals and better utilization of resources.

Education/INCASE

These presentations, with a post-secondary educational focus, are designed for an audience of college level faculty who are seeking to enhance the quality of training and education in addiction studies, to disseminate professional knowledge and share ideas regarding addiction studies, students, and scholarship in the field of addiction studies with an evidence-based focus.

  • BREAKOUT: Now That You Know It... How Do You Do It?presented by Kathy Elson, MS, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS, MAC, SAP

In the college academic setting, students learn about theory, theorists, who did what when, and techniques for the “helping profession.” As we know, knowledge of the facts does not necessarily transfer into accurate demonstration of the skills for our students. This workshop will focus on assignments that will provide opportunities for deeper understanding and learning of skills, thus improving the level of competency of demonstration by our students. These assignments focus on the demonstration of the skills, along with self-critique and other critique as methods of assessment, evaluation, and improvement. Participants are encouraged to bring classroom assignments with them to the presentation to share with other members in attendance.

  • Building an International Drug Demand Reduction Workforce, presented by Joanna Travis-Roberts, MA, and Becky Vaughn, MSEd

Assessing student readiness is both an academic requirement and an ethical responsibility. As such, creating a solid plan for assessing and responding to student concerns and areas of growth is key to creating well-rounded professionals who are ready to work with clients. This presentation will discuss the process of recreating a new set of guidelines and assessments to ensure this is being met within our program. We believe that in order to create strong professionals for our field we need to be providing strong guidance and feedback for what is expected and ways that the students can continue to growth. This is done through consistent feedback, self-evaluations, competency benchmarks, and mentoring.

  • BREAKOUT: Integrating a Robust Addictions Curriculum into a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Programpresented by Monica Himes, PhD, LCSW, CADC

Social workers will encounter persons with substance use disorders in nearly every setting within a community, including child welfare, schools, hospitals, and shelters. Due to the pervasiveness of SUDs into every aspect of a person’s life, it is imperative that all social work students be equipped with the basic knowledge and skills to work effectively with this population. This session will describe how social work faculty at any school can collaborate to build a relevant and robust curriculum to educate students about addiction and to increase empathy while raising awareness of personal bias. Participants will be offered current data and resources so they can begin to build their own curriculum, as well as tips and ideas for gaining department and university support.

  • BREAKOUT: Academic Assessment and Evaluation in Addiction Counselor Educationpresented by Roy Kammer, EdD, LADC, LPC, CPPR

Students in addiction counselor education programs are preparing to do important work. Educators are entrusted with supporting students in their development as professionals and continually improving programs to meet the changing needs of the field. Thoughtful assessment of student learning and program evaluation are essential in this process. This presentation will provide an overview of common regulatory elements and basic concepts related to assessment of student learning and program evaluation. Participants will explore practical methods of assessment and evaluation that are meaningful and efficient. Participants will conceptualize opportunities for developing or improving the assessment and evaluation of their academic programs and determine methods for applying the data they collect.

  • BREAKOUT: Addiction Education and the Law: Protecting Yourself, Your University, and Your Studentspresented by John Korkow, LAC, SAP, PhD

Recent legal cases, out of court settlements, contract disputes, and interpretations of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Title IX, and FERPA all point to the need for the professional in education to get up to speed on the rapidly expanding topic of education and the law. This presentation will cover the goals of understanding legal, ethical, and moral implications of a variety of actions when working with students in the college setting. The objectives include following guidelines to avoid legal issues, creating and maintaining proper student records, and avoiding errors that can become lawsuits.

  • BREAKOUT: Making the Neurobiology of Addiction More Accessible to Studentspresented by John Paulson, LCSW, LCAC, MAC, NCSE, and Kelsey Teel

Neuroscience continues to enrich our understanding of the biological aspects of addiction. Addiction counseling students often find this material daunting, especially ones with more limited backgrounds in science. This workshop will offer examples and materials to help translate neurobiological information on addiction into the classroom in accessible, understandable, and meaningful ways.

Peer Recovery (Non-clinical)

These presentations cover the relationship-based roles of peers, peer support through a culturally-responsive lens, peer support through a trauma-informed lens, techniques for increasing self-awareness, self-care, sustaining empathy and connection in peer support roles, and methods for incorporating organizational wellness strategies to create a holistic work environment.

  • PANEL DISCUSSION: The Peer Recovery Movement: A Continuing Conversation Panelpresented by Gerard J. Schmidt, MA, LPC, MAC, Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC, Joe Powell, LCDC, RSPS, PSS, Honesty Liller, CPRS, John Cates, MA, LCDC, Kyle Brewer, BS, PRPS, and Helen "Skip" Skipper

In 2021, our peer panel held a lively discussion to reflect on the rapidly growing sector of peers within the addiction profession. Panelists shared their wisdom and experience in a fun and energetic forum. This year, the conversation will continue with a more concentrated look at the role of peers and continued integration into the recovery model. From CPRSS to PhD, everyone has a place at the table within the continuum of care. This presentation and panel will focus on lessons learned that will be shared from experienced pioneers in the recovery movement. Additionally, the panel will identify key priorities to help advance the peer recovery support workforce as well as ways to integrate with the treatment workforce.

  • BREAKOUT: Supporting Recovery: Who's Who at the Zoo?presented by Randy Anderson, RCP, LADC, CPRS-S

Peer recovery services are becoming an integral part of the process for those seeking or already in recovery from substance use. That said, there is often a lot of confusion around the specific role of a Peer Recovery Specialist (PRS), also called a Recovery Coach (RC). This interactive presentation is meant to help provide some clarity around the benefits of integrating peer recovery specialists into the recovery process.

  • BREAKOUT: Navigating a Pathway of Recovery: One Click at a Timepresented by Marisa Barbieri, MSC, and Dawn Wilkin, CPS

Many communities around the country are adopting the deployment of peer services to support linkage to care in their communities. According to SAMSHA, emerging research shows that peer support is effective for supporting recovery from behavioral health conditions and opioid use. The session will 1) present various successful peer initiatives around the nation, 2) discuss the steps necessary for sites to organize and successfully deploy peer models, 3) discuss innovations used to support an integrated peer recovery model, and 4) provide lessons learned from sites around the country that implemented various technologies.

  • BREAKOUT: Developing a Framework for a Recovery-Oriented Workplace Culturepresented by MacKenzie Phillips, MPH, Sarah Shapiro, and Nicole Knight, PRS-S

This workshop will provide insight to participants interested in developing a recovery-oriented workplace culture free of stigma and intentional about empowering individuals in recovery. The framework discussed will include evidence-based practices such as narrative therapy and cultural competency, and will highlight the importance of peer-led interventions and embracing all pathways to recovery. The presentation will also provide guidance on the use of peers in leadership positions to establish an internal infrastructure rooted in mentorship and self-care, and to support employees in recovery. This will be an interactive workshop with the opportunity for self-reflection.

  • BREAKOUT: Sacred Circlespresented by Dawn Allred, LPC, MAC

Groups are a cornerstone of addiction treatment and recovery support services. We will explore spiritual traditions and discuss how creating sacred space will enhance the power of group and recovery. The goal is to create a vibrant discussion of the sacred, and find the missing pieces/peace in recovery for those seeking a new life. This presentation will address how to bring a gift of hope, healing, and holistic wellness to individuals seeking a new way to live in recovery.

  • BREAKOUT: Enhancing Peer Support: Harnessing the Full Potential of People with Lived Experiencespresented by Katie Mayeda, LCSW

People know the power of peer support, but few organizations know how to maximize the expertise of people with lived experience. Often agencies hire peers and don’t have the infrastructure to train and support them to help them achieve success in their jobs. Sadly, organizations can cause more harm than good. This workshop will discuss how to develop a program that helps peers learn the tools they need to thrive at their jobs and use their experience to enhance programming. This presentation will provide innovative solutions to the challenges many organizations face incorporating peers successfully.

  • BREAKOUT: Trauma-Informed Peer Support Interactive Sessionpresented by Candace Alley, NCCPSS, CADC-I, CPRC, CPTP

Trauma-informed peer support will be the topic of discussion for our session. We will discuss how being a more trauma-informed individual can potentially assist us in our day-to-day interactions with other community members, peers, and colleagues alike. We will discuss how we can begin to move from trauma-informed to being more trauma-responsive as individuals and communities that will hopefully lead to a better understanding of what some of our underlying issues are that cause recidivism, why individuals often do not feel included in their plan of treatment, and what we can do as helping professionals to help change this unsupportive dynamic many people in recovery have and continue to feel as peer supporters, specialists, clinicians, and supervisors.


Full Schedule

Please note session times may be subject to change. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.
Full session descriptions are listed in track information above.

Friday, October 7, 2022 - 7 CEs
7:00AM - 8:00PM REGISTRATION
8:30AM – 5:00PM PRE-CONFERENCE SESSIONS (7 CES EACH)
  • Rehabilitating Addiction Treatment: An Anti-Racist Recovery Approach Workshoppresented by Sarah Buino, LCSW, RDDP, CADC, CDWF, and Sarah Suzuki, LCSW, CADC
     
  • Total Telehealth: From Basic Set-Up to Applying Evidence-Based Practicespresented by Fredrick Dombrowski, PhD, LMHC, MAC, CASAC

  • Basics of Addiction Counseling: Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substance Use Disorderspresented by Ehab El Kharrat, PhD
     
  • Basics of Addiction Counseling: Theories, Practices, and Skillspresented by Don P. Osborn, PhD, LCAC, MAC
     
  • Clinical Supervision: What You Need to Know to Grow Counselorspresented by Malcolm Horn, PhD, LCSW, MAC, SAP
     
  • Peer Supervision: Leadership & Lived Experiencepresented by Kyle Brewer, BS, PRPS, and Bonnie Stribling, PRPS
     
  • Being Our Most Ethical Selfpresented by Kathryn Benson, LADC, NCAC II, QSC, and Frances Patterson, PhD, LADAC II, MAC, SAP
     
  • Tobacco Free Recovery Workshop and Provider Resources Available to Implement Evidence-Based Tobacco Treatment Interventions (a two-part training)presented by Karen S. Hudmon, DrPH, MS, RPh, CTTS, Deborah Buckles, BS, RRT, NCTTP, Jennifer Cofer, MPH, CHES, and Alex Hurst, MHA
     
  • Ética, Disparidades Raciales y Justicia Social en los Servicios de Adicción para Inmigrantes y Refugiadospresented by Pierluigi Mancini, PhD, MAC

    This training is sponsored by the Multicultural Development Institute, Inc..
LUNCH BREAK TBD

(Meals are not provided by NAADAC for pre-conference sessions.)

4:00PM – 6:00PM MINORITY FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM FOR ADDICTIONS COUNSELORS (MFP-AC) ORIENTATION (CLOSED SESSION)
5:30PM – 8:00PM NAADAC BOOKSTORE OPEN
6:00PM – 8:00PM 50th Anniversary WELCOME Reception in the Exhibit Hall 
9:00PM – 10:00PM MUTUAL SUPPORT MEETING
Saturday, October 8, 2022 - 8.5 CEs
7:00AM – 4:15PM REGISTRATION
7:00AM – 8:00AM CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST IN EXHIBIT HALL
7:00AM – 4:15PM POSTER PRESENTATIONS & EXHIBIT HALL OPEN
7:30AM – 7:00PM NAADAC BOOKSTORE OPEN
8:00am - 9:00am opening session (1 CE)

Welcome & State of NAADAC, presented by Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LAC, MAC, SAP, and Cynthia Moreno Tuohy, BSW, NCAC II, CDC III, SAP

9:00am - 10:15am MORNING keynote session (1.25 CEs)

Progressing Forward in Relapse Prevention: Dealing with Stigma, presented by Samson Teklemariam, LPC, CPTM

10:15am - 10:45am MORNING BREAK IN EXHIBIT HALL
10:45am - 12:15am breakout sessions (1.5 CEs each)
  • Be the One, Save Someone with Naloxone: A Bystander Intervention for Opioid Reversal, presented by Susie Mullens, MS, LPC, AADC-S, and Susan Bissett, PhD
     
  • The Effective Use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) with Substance Use Clients, presented by Christopher Shea, MA, CRAT, CAC-AD, LCC
     
  • Empowering Families to Build Recovery Capital for Sustained Recovery and Family Well-Being, presented by Kirstin Frescoln, PhD, CPM, and Al Falcon, MS, LCPC, LAC
     
  • Healing Trauma in the Path of Recovery, presented by Rafael Cortina, LMFT
     
  • Preparing for Risk in Behavioral Health Care – HR May Be the Highest Risk!, presented by Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC
     
  • Assessments, Interventions, and Treatments for Problematic Sexual Behavior, presented by Dalanna Burris, MS, LPC-A, LCDC, CSAT
     
  • Language Matters – Working With Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders, presented by Dawnia Flonnoy, MA, and Elizabeth Bullock, BA
     
  • Supporting Recovery: Who's Who at the Zoo?, presented by Randy Anderson, RCP, LADC, CPRS-S
     
  • Digital Assessments for Predicting Patient Success, Personalizing Care Plans, & Measuring Outcomes, presented by Evian Gordon, MD, PhD
     
  • Now That You Know It... How Do You Do It?, presented by Kathy Elson, MS, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS, MAC, SAP
12:15pm - 2:15pm et lunch IN EXHIBIT HALL
2:15pm - 3:45pm breakout sessions (1.5 Ces each)
  • Better Brain Condition = Better Treatment Response = Better Outcomes, presented by Judi Kosterman, EdD, Jordan Scott, Certified Neuro-Tech, and Robin Rudnikoff
     
  • Dying to Connect: Addiction as an Attachment Disorder, presented by Ellen Elliot, PhD, LCAS, LCMHC, CSAT
     
  • Family-Centered Approach for Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders, presented by Kimberly-Ann Coe, BSW, and Brian Southworth, MSW
     
  • Untangling Meth, Sex, and Intimacy: Skills for Clinical Practice, presented by David Fawcett, PhD, LCSW, CSAT
     
  • Developing Staff, Engaging Patients, presented by Christopher Yadron, PhD, LCPC, CADC
     
  • Compulsive Sexual and Love Behavior: Etiology and Culturally-Responsive Treatment for Sex Addiction, presented by Cortny Stark, PhD, LPC, LAC, LPCC
     
  • Sex, Drugs, and Generational Trauma: Assessment and Treatment Planning with LGBTQIA+ Folks, presented by Evan Rosenthal, LPCC, LADC, LPC
     
  • Navigating a Pathway of Recovery: One Click at a Time, presented by Marisa Barbieri, MSC, and Dawn Wilkin, CPS
     
  • Using Technology to Treat Substance Use Disorder, presented by Elliott Liebling, MPH, and Jeffrey Cummis, MA
     
  • Building an International Drug Demand Reduction Workforce, presented by Joanna Travis-Roberts, MA, and Becky Vaughn, MSEd
3:45pm - 4:15pm AFTERNOON BREAK IN EXHIBIT HALL
4:15pm - 5:30pm AFTERNOON keynote session (1.25 ces)

The Counselor’s Guide to Addressing Medical Cannabis in Treatment Settings, presented by Aaron Norton, PhD

7:00pm - 9:00pm peer panel (2 ces)

The Peer Recovery Movement: A Continuing Conversation Panel, presented by Gerard J. Schmidt, MA, LPC, MAC, Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC, Joe Powell, LCDC, RSPS, PSS, Honesty Liller, CPRS, John Cates, MA, LCDC, Kyle Brewer, BS, PRPS, and Helen "Skip" Skipper

9:00PM – 10:00PM MUTUAL SUPPORT MEETINg
Sunday, October 9, 2022 - 6 CEs
7:00AM – 7:30AM SUNDAY RELIGIOUS SERVICE CATHOLIC & NONDENOMINATIONAL
7:30AM – 4:00PM REGISTRATION
7:30AM – 5:00PM NAADAC BOOKSTORE OPEN
7:30AM – 2:00PM POSTER PRESENTATIONS & EXHIBIT HALL OPEN
7:30AM – 8:30AM CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST IN EXHIBIT HALL
8:30am - 10:00am MORNING keynote session (1.5 ces)

Resilience in Healthcare Leadership: Practicing Self-Care to Prevent Burnout, presented by Amer Kaissi, PhD

10:00am - 10:30am MORNING BREAK IN EXHIBIT HALL
10:30am - 12:00pm breakout sessions (1.5 ces each)
  • Recovery Status, Education, and 12-Step Adherence & SUD Counselors' Opiate Replacement Preferences, presented by Joseph Stanley, PhD, LAC, LPC
     
  • Addiction and Moral Injury, presented by Dorothy "Dottie" Greene, PhD, LCSW, LADAC II, QCS
     
  • Understanding the Neuroscience Behind Behavior, presented by Boni-Lou Roberts and Dana Malone-White, MSW, LCSW
     
  • Dialectic Tools: Treating Those With Co-occurring Substance Use and Personality Disorders, presented by Fredrick Dombrowski, PhD, LMHC, LADC, MAC
     
  • Triple Threat: How Lawsuits, the Government, and You Can Combat Insurance Discrimination, presented by Caroline Reynolds, JD, MA, Jason Cowart, JD, and David Lloyd
     
  • Dying on the Hamster Wheel: Understanding Compulsive Work From an Attachment Perspective, presented by Mary F. Gay, PhD, LPC
     
  • Stories of Our Ancestors: The Impact of Culture, Race, Trauma on Addictions, presented by Johnny Alexander, LICSW, ACSW, MAC, SAP
     
  • Developing a Framework for a Recovery-Oriented Workplace Culture, presented by MacKenzie Phillips, MPH, Sarah Shapiro, and Nicole Knight, PRS-S
     
  • Integrating a Robust Addictions Curriculum into a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Program, presented by Monica Himes, PhD, LCSW, CADC
     
  • TBD
12:00pm - 2:00pm LUNCH IN EXHIBIT HALL
2:00pm - 3:30pm breakout sessions (1.5 ces each)
  • "The Reign of Pain is Mainly in the Brain" - Pain Reprocessing Therapy for Chronic Pain, presented by Mike Bricker, MS, NCAC II, CADC II, LPC
     
  • Recovery Resilience vs. Shame and Stigma: Necessary Innovations in Treating Substance Use Disorders, presented by Bob Weathers, PhD, CMHRS
     
  • Integrating the Language of the Nervous System into Recovery Support, presented by JF Benoist, CSAC
     
  • Preventing Deaths of Despair: Overdose, Suicide, and Alcohol Liver Disease, presented by Geoff Wilson, LCSW, LCADC
     
  • The Intersection of DEA, Opioids, and MAT, presented by Dennis Wichern
     
  • Loneliness, Jealousy, and Personality Functioning in Problematic Mobile Phone Use, presented by Errol Rodriguez, PhD, CRC, MAC
     
  • Reducing Recidivism: The Ethical Core of Human Rights, presented by Shannon Kratky, MS, LPC, LCDC, NCC, and Nancy Tamburo-Treviῆo, MA, MSW, LPC-S, LCDC
     
  • Sacred Circles, presented by Dawn Allred, LPC, MAC
     
  • Technology-Enabled Transformation to Enhance Treatment and Address the Addiction Crisis, presented by Rae Green, JD, MA, LPC, CAADC, Alec Green, and Paul Joiner
     
  • Academic Assessment and Evaluation in Addiction Counselor Education, presented by Roy Kammer, EdD, LADC, LPC, CPPR
3:30PM – 4:00PM AFTERNOON BREAK
4:00pm - 5:30pm AFTERNOON keynote session (1.5 ces)

It’s Time to Fully Integrate Medications and Addiction Recovery, presented by Marvin D. Seppala, MD, Robert L. DuPont, MD, and William White

7:00pm - 9:00pm NAADAC EDUCATION & RESEARCH FOUNDATION (NERF) AUCTION
9:00PM – 10:00PM MUTUAL SUPPORT MEETINg
Monday, October 10, 2022 - 6.5 CEs
7:30AM – 4:15PM REGISTRATION
7:30AM – 4:15PM NAADAC BOOKSTORE OPEN
7:30AM – 8:30AM CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST IN EXHIBIT HALL
8:00am - 8:30am naadac leadership Q&A (0.5 ces)

Q&A with NAADAC President & Executive Director, with Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LAC, MAC, SAP, and Cynthia Moreno Tuohy, BSW, NCAC II, CDC III, SAP

8:30am - 10:00am MORNING keynote session (1.5 ces)

Federal Update with ONDCP, NIDA, & SAMHSApresented by Nora D. Volkow, MD, Miriam E. Delphin-Rittmon, PhD, and Rahul Gupta, MD, MPH, MBA, FACP

10:00am - 10:30am MORNING BREAK
10:30am - 12:00pm breakout sessions (1.5 ces each)
  • Factors for a Proposed Grand Unified Theory of Addiction and Recovery, presented by Jeff Sandoz, PhD, LMHC, MAP, ICADC, and Richard (Rick) Paul Green III, BSBA, LCDC
     
  • Treatment: The Emotions at the Heart of Addiction, presented by Ken J. Martz, PsyD, MBA
     
  • Invisible Loyalties: Uncovering the Transgenerational Impact of Addiction, presented by Aaron Olson, LCMHC, SUDC
     
  • Understanding the Beauty Behind Distraction: ADHD and SUD, presented by Samson Teklemariam, LPC, CPTM
     
  • Clinical Supervision in the New Age, presented by Dan Bizjak, MSW, LCSW, ICS, CSAC
     
  • Pornography Addiction: A Mirage of Intimacy, presented by Rommel Johnson, PhD, LPC, CAADC, CRC
     
  • Practice Standards for Older Adults: Preliminary Directions, presented by Keith Morgen, LPC, ACS
     
  • Enhancing Peer Support: Harnessing the Full Potential of People with Lived Experiences, presented by Katie Mayeda, LCSW
     
  • Best Practices in Technology-Enabled Peer Recovery Support, presented by Jon Dower, ICADC, CCS, SAP, CIP, Dan McCawley, ICPR, CIP, and Caitlyn Larson, BSN, RN, MBA
     
  • Addiction Education and the Law: Protecting Yourself, Your University, and Your Students, presented by John Korkow, LAC, SAP, PhD
12:00pm - 12:15pm break
12:15pm - 2:00pm 50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATORY AWARDS LUNCHEON
2:00pm - 2:15pm break
2:15pm - 3:45pm breakout sessions (1.5 ces each)
  • Medication-Assisted Treatment Basics and Beyond, presented by Brian Russ, PhD, LMHC, NCC, DCMHS, and Bruce Baker, MD, CMRO, ABAM
     
  • A Skydiver’s View of Reality Therapy in Action, presented by Bob Wubbolding, EdD, RTC, LPCC
     
  • Expanding Access to Care - Recovery Rapid Response and Mobile Crisis Service Programs, presented by Denise Dickerson, MS, LCADC, LCPC, and Jason Phelan, BA
     
  • Surviving A Loss: Uncovering Grief's Role in Recovery, presented by Gigi Veasey, LCSW, LISAC, CCBT
     
  • Patient Retention: How to Keep Those You Have and Bring More In, presented by Kristyn Graham, PhD
     
  • Preventing and Treating Problem Gambling: Findings and Recommendations From a Statewide Assessment, presented by Hannah Carliner, ScD, MPH, Jim Wilkerson, LCPC, and Allyson Auerbach, MPH
     
  • Antiracist Addiction Treatment Requires Decriminalization and Harm Reduction, presented by Sandy Gibson, PhD, LCSW, LCADC
     
  • Trauma-Informed Peer Support Interactive Session, presented by Candace Alley, NCCPSS, CADC-I, CPRC, CPTP
     
  • Ready to Change: A Review of Treatment and Technological Modifications Subsequent to the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Delivery of Medication Assisted Treatment, presented by Latonya Lee-Niang, EdD, LCADC, CCS, SAP
     
  • Making the Neurobiology of Addiction More Accessible to Students, presented by John Paulson, LCSW, LCAC, MAC, NCSE, and Kelsey Teel
3:45pm - 4:15pm afternoon break
4:15pm - 5:45pm AFTERNOON KEYNOTE & CLOSING CEREMONY (1.5 ces)

Sociometrics: Resilience Building Processes in Working with Trauma and Addiction, presented by Tian Dayton, PhD

9:00PM – 10:00PM MUTUAL SUPPORT MEETING
Tuesday, October 11, 2022 - 7 CEs
7:00AM – 11:00AM REGISTRATION
8:15AM – 5:30PM POST-CONFERENCE SESSIONS (7 CES EACH)
  • Assessing and Treating Co-occurring Disorders in 2022presented by Gerry Schmidt, MA, LPC, MAC, and Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC
     
  • Substance Abuse Professional's U.S. DOT Alcohol and Drug Testing Regulation Initial Qualification Coursepresented by Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LPC, MAC, SAP, CTHP-II
     
  • Sociometrics: Experiential Therapy Made Manageablepresented by Tian Dayton, PhD
12:00PM – 1:45PM LUNCH BREAK

(Meals are not provided by NAADAC for post-conference sessions.)

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 7 CEs
8:15AM – 5:30PM POST-CONFERENCE SESSIONS (7 CES EACH)
  • Assessing and Treating Co-occurring Disorders in 2022presented by Gerry Schmidt, MA, LPC, MAC, and Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC
     
  • Substance Abuse Professional's U.S. DOT Alcohol and Drug Testing Regulation Initial Qualification Coursepresented by Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LPC, MAC, SAP, CTHP-II
     
  • Sociometrics: Experiential Therapy Made Manageablepresented by Tian Dayton, PhD
12:00PM – 1:45PM LUNCH BREAK

(Meals are not provided by NAADAC for post-conference sessions.)

Register Now!


Business Schedules & Partner Meetings

NAADAC Executive Committee Schedule

FRIDAY, October 7
7:30AM - 8:30AM NAADAC Executive Committee Breakfast
8:30AM – 5:00PM NAADAC Executive Committee Meeting
12:30PM – 1:30PM NAADAC Executive Committee Meeting Lunch
6:00PM - 8:00PM NAADAC 2022 Annual Conference & 50th Anniversary Celebration Welcome Reception
Saturday, october 8
8:00AM - 9:00AM Opening Kickoff & Keynote Session
1:00PM - 2:00PM International Caucus Meeting
Sunday, october 9
8:30AM - 5:30PM NAADAC Board of Directors Meeting
12:00PM - 2:00PM NAADAC Board of Directors Meeting Lunch
7:00PM - 9:00PM NAADAC Education & Research Foundation (NERF) Auction
Monday, october 10
8:00AM - 8:30AM Q&A with NAADAC President & Executive Director
12:15PM - 2:00PM 50th Anniversary Celebratory Awards Luncheon
4:15PM - 5:45PM Closing Keynote Session & Ceremony

NCC AP Schedule

FRIDAY, October 7
6:00PM - 8:00PM NAADAC 2022 Annual Conference & 50th Anniversary Celebration Welcome Reception
Saturday, october 8
8:00AM - 9:00AM Opening Kickoff & Keynote Session
1:00PM - 2:00PM International Caucus Meeting
Sunday, october 9
8:30AM - 5:30PM NCC AP Meeting
12:00PM - 2:00PM Break
7:00PM - 9:00PM NAADAC Education & Research Foundation (NERF) Auction
Monday, october 10
12:15PM - 2:00PM 50th Anniversary Celebratory Awards Luncheon
4:15PM - 5:45PM Closing Keynote Session & Ceremony

INCASE Schedule

Thursday, October 6
1:00PM - 4:00PM INCASE Board Meeting
FRIDAY, October 7
9:00AM - 12:00PM INCASE Board Meeting
7:30PM - 8:30PM INCASE Board Meeting
8:30PM - 10:00PM INCASE Reception

NASAC Schedule

Thursday, October 6
6:00PM - 7:30PM NASAC Advisory Board Meeting
7:30PM - 9:00PM NASAC Commissioners Meeting