Over the past year, the world - and the addiction profession - have experienced a whirlwind of changes. These newfound challenges have pushed us all beyond our comfort zones and provided a new way of thinking about addiction, treatment, and recovery.

With this year's virtual conference, we want to equip all addiction professionals with the tools they need to deliver the most current, inclusive, and well-rounded care to their clients while helping to pave the way towards a healthier, client-centered future. We want to help you help others!

The 2021 Annual Conference will feature six interactive keynote sessions, 54 immersive breakout sessions, a live Q&A with NAADAC and NCC AP leadership, two engaging panel discussions, virtual poster presentations, a virtual exhibit hall, networking opportunities, and so much more!

Training sessions are within the following six subject tracks:

Clinical Skills

These presentations cover clinical knowledge, skills, practices, and interventions to help clinicians best support those with a substance use disorder or other addiction.

  • KEYNOTE: Alcohol Recovery Medicine: Making Alcoholism Uncommon, presented by John Umhau, MD, MPH, CPE

Ignoring the scientific evidence about medical therapy for alcohol craving and cognitive impairment can cause unnecessary suffering. Simple nutritional advice can be a critical part of recovery counseling and promote improved gut health, reduce liver inflammation, and improve brain function. Medications may eliminate the need for acute detoxification through a gradual reduction in alcohol consumption and be a gateway to treatment and to eventual abstinence. The targeted use of naltrexone, popularly known as the Sinclair Method, is an example of how anti-craving medications can extinguish drinking behavior. Optimal alcohol recovery medicine requires a partnership between physicians and addiction counselors, a partnership that has the potential to minimize the devastation of alcohol use disorder.

  • BREAKOUT: Counseling in Addiction: The Impact of Narrative Digital Storytelling & the Process of Change, presented by Toni F. Monroe, MS, APC, NCAC II, IC&RC

Narrative Digital Stories (NDS), a growing phenomenon, is a blend of narratives and digital artifacts. Through this deliberate collaboration, personal narratives can come to life (Rebmann, 2012). In fact, narrative therapy, a postmodern approach to counseling, maintains a focus on subjective truth whereby the counselor facilitates the "re-authoring" of stories by the client. Narrative techniques are particularly useful when working with clients who might have been disempowered by a societal perspective of addiction that can reinforce negative beliefs and images that discourage and alter the worldview of the client.

  • BREAKOUT: A Positive Approach to Relapse Prevention, presented by Gary Blanchard, MA, LADC I, MA-PGS

Terrance Gorski states that relapse and recovery are two sides of the same coin. Some have found that the emphasis placed on the possibility of relapse leads to doubt about the ability to be successful in recovery. Gary Blanchard presents a new way to approach this issue by offering a focus on building and maintaining recovery. This success-centered approach presents many of the common skills of relapse prevention, but frames them in a positive manner that supports success rather than undermining confidence.

  • BREAKOUT: Acute Critical Incident Desensitization, presented by Larisa Traga, LCSW, MAC, CCDS

We all are challenged from time to time with an acute traumatic incident; for example: a pandemic, assault, divorce, natural disaster, accident, sudden loss of a loved one, and others. While just talking with a supportive ear often helps the survivor work through the experience, at times talking is not enough – the survivor is still ‘living it.’ In those situations, more focused interventions may be necessary. Critical Incident Desensitization Protocol (CIDP) utilizes bilateral eye movements to help desensitize the survivor to the traumatic event to the point where talking about it may be of help. Research has shown that bilateral eye movements rapidly diminish the vividness of images and the strong emotions/physical sensations associated with a traumatic event.

  • BREAKOUT: Integrating Harm Reduction Strategies into Your Practice, presented by Kimberly May, LPC-S, LMFT

Deaths from drug overdose have been on the rise for the past few years, and although devastating, they are preventable. This presentation will explore the role of harm reduction in the therapeutic setting and how through the constant promotion of safety, we can help save lives. By exploring the adaptive function of drugs and the roles of ambivalence and acceptance, we can help people feel that their lives are worth saving.

  • BREAKOUT: Finding the ASAM Golden Thread, presented by Richard Whittington, MA, SUDP

This presentation will discuss the importance of utilizing an ASAM assessment and how the six dimensions thread together for the assessment. It will cover how to utilize the information from within the six dimensions and why the information from the six dimensions can be utilized to develop a strong ISP (Individual Service Plan).

  • BREAKOUT: Practitioner’s Guide for Using Reality Therapy with Difficult Clients, presented by Robert Wubbolding, EdD, LPCC, CRT

Immediately usable ideas constitute the focus of this presentation. After a short summary of the WDEP system of Reality Therapy, the presenter illustrates its use in a simulated counseling session. Participants will derive specific skills and techniques related to the key component of reality therapy: helping clients evaluate their own actions, thoughts, and emotions in order to formulate attainable, measurable, immediate plans for positive change. Self-evaluation is a skill that has often become dysfunctional for persons with substance abuse disorders. Through the use of empathy and careful listening, the counselor assists clients to see the value and desirability of making seemingly small but actually significant behavioral changes that are internally satisfying to them.

  • BREAKOUT: Preventing Suicide Death in Substance Use Treatment Settings: Applying the Zero Suicide Framework, presented by Shelby Kuhn, MSW, LCSW, SAC

Individuals with AUD have 10x greater risk for suicide than the general population. This risk is additionally elevated in individuals with OUD, particularly injection drug users (SAMSHA, 2015). Within SUD settings, clients are at risk for suicide due to the complex nature of their clinical presentation. The Zero Suicide framework of suicide care provides a model of best practices for delivering safer care embedded within a system-wide, transformational quality improvement paradigm. The framework sets forth processes to identify individuals at-risk for suicide, engage them in collaborative care practices, and provide evidence-based, suicide-specific treatment. This session will explore the Zero Suicide model and provide guidance on considerations for care delivery with SUD clients.

  • BREAKOUT: Dos, Don'ts, and How tos: Best Practices in Group Facilitation, presented by Ryan Wells, ACS, CADC-II, MSCJ, MDiv

Inside of every great substance use disorder counselor is a great group facilitator. This session will teach you how to bring life and a fresh approach with innovation and ingenuity to every group process. Together, we will learn how to embrace the changing culture and sub-cultures in a post-COVID world of persons served. The front lines have now been blurred and together we can help those caught in the fog through life-changing group facilitation.

  • BREAKOUT: Flourish in Recovery, presented by Jason Powers, MD, MAPP

While avoiding a relapse and removing the bad stuff is vital, empowering others to live their best life requires a new approach. It's just as important to build the good stuff through positive recovery, a novel approach that combines the best of the old with the new science of well-being, positive psychology.

Co-occurring Disorders & Process Addictions

These presentations focus on integrated treatment and best practices for the treatment of mental health disorders that often co-occur with substance use disorders. These presentations also cover best practices for the treatment of process addictions (or behavioral addictions), such as sex and love addiction, gambling addiction, and food addiction.

  • PANEL DISCUSSION: Trauma, Grief, and Resiliency Panel, presented by Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, Geoff Wilson, LCSW, LCADC, Tian Dayton, PhD, and Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LAC, MAC, SAP

Across the country, individuals, families, and communities have dealt with trauma, grief, and loss resulting from a variety of sources including a global pandemic, forced physical isolation, a rise in overdoses and suicides, a surge in racism, and much more. As the country begins to open and build towards a new normal, we must address the trauma and grief, and then focus on our capacity to recover – resiliency. Now, more than ever, addiction professionals need an opportunity to connect and share best practices. Join this virtual town hall event to learn from leading experts on how to foster resiliency – for ourselves, for our clients, and for our industry. 

  • KEYNOTE: SOCIOMETRICS: Resilience Building Processes in Working with Trauma and Addiction, presented by Tian Dayton, PhD

Talk alone does not reach the kinds of inner states wherein trauma is held. Research on neurobiology has revealed the importance of an approach to healing trauma that involves the body as well as the mind. This can be challenging for treatment centers both in training staff and creating safety. Sociometrics are psychoeducational processes that make bringing experiential work into treatment programming measured, safe, and effective. Floor checks teach about subjects such as trauma, grief, and resilience as they simultaneously provide interpersonal and community healing processes. They can be easily adapted to be gender and culture-sensitive. They give therapists a clearly outlined process that builds momentum for change, teaches the skills of emotional regulation and literacy, and makes work more focused and contained.

  • BREAKOUT: Dissociation: The Hidden Co-occurring Disorder, presented by Roseann Lynch, LPC, NCC, RPT, CDC-1

Co-occurring disorders create challenges and lapses/relapses are common. When an individual has a trauma history, treatment becomes more complicated. Little research attention is focused on dissociative symptoms related to relapse. Lack of research limits clinicians in recognizing dissociative symptoms and many clients remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Inaccurate diagnoses play havoc with the individual’s recovery. If you feel unskilled and frustrated in treating some clients, dissociative symptoms may be under the surface. This workshop will help you recognize subtle and overt dissociative symptoms, understand the role dissociation plays in trauma and addictions, and provide you a screening tool and further training resources.

  • BREAKOUT: Don’t Judge a Brain by Its Cover: Understanding Co-occurring Brain Injury & Substance Use Disorders, presented by Stephanie Huhn, MA, LLP, CBIS, CAADC, and Colin King, PhD, LP, CAADC

Often we observe the actions, moods, words, and behaviors of our clients and utilize this information to draw conclusions on appropriate diagnoses and treatment methods. However, there is often a piece left unseen: brain injury, sometimes referred to as the “invisible injury." Injuries to the brain are prevalent particularly in those with substance use disorder diagnoses, yet they often go undiagnosed, underrecognized, under-assessed, and are left untreated or mistreated. In this session, we will discuss co-occurring brain injury and substance use disorder diagnoses, including assessment, symptoms, diagnosis, challenges-faced in treatment, and the prevalence of other mental health diagnoses as well treatment tools, methods, and techniques.

  • BREAKOUT: When They Can't Unplug: Understanding Video Game Addiction in Adolescents, presented by Thad Shunkwiler, LMFT, LPCC, CCMHC, ACS

From Super Mario Brothers to Fortnite, the popularity of video games has never been greater. Within the gaming community, there is growing number of adolescents who simply cannot put the controller down. This workshop will examine the phenomena of gaming disorder as defined by the World Health Organization's ICD-11. Participants will learn about the symptoms and best practices in treating gaming disorder.

  • BREAKOUT: People Like Me: Working with Vulnerable Populations Using an Integrated Model to Behavioral Health, presented by Sheryl Neverson, PhD, LCSW-C, LICSW

To say life is a struggle, especially in these uncertain times, would be an understatement. This struggle can switch from a slight burden to a crushing force that presses you to the bone. What makes these burdens even more debilitating is the feeling that we are meant to carry them alone; that seeking help to handle what life throws at us is a sign of weakness or failure on our part. This presentation will demonstrate how to address the needs of vulnerable populations using the CCBHC model. As a new SAMSHA grantee, this presentation will show participants the strengths and lessons learned as a first year grantee. It will also show how the use of the CCBHC model can help attract and retain the most vulnerable populations in your community.

  • BREAKOUT: Beyond Integrated Care, presented by Melinda Drake, LISW CP & AP, LCSW

Addiction was redefined by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) as a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory, and related circuitry in 2012, but it has yet to be treated like other chronic diseases. Even the CDC Chronic Disease Overview webpage does not list addiction as a chronic disease. In the United States, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chronic disease is the major cause of death and disability (2016). Treatment modality debates in addiction seem to also overlook lessons from the chronic disease treatment model, that the life of a person afflicted with a chronic disease, such as addiction, is irreversibly changed.

  • BREAKOUT: Counseling Through the Co-occurring Conundrum: Demystifying Treatment of Dual Diagnoses, presented by Jessica A. Love Jordan-Banks, MHS, LPC, CADC

On average, 50% of people who experience a substance use disorder (SUD) will also experience a mental health disorder (MHD) (NIDA, 2020). Research supports integrated treatment as the best approach to addressing co-occurring disorders. As such, counselors must increase their capacity for treating comorbid SUD and MHD, especially amid the COVID-related behavioral health challenges communities now face. This session will be a crash course for participants to enhance their skills for treating clients with co-occurring SUD and MHD. Participants will learn the definitive aspects of co-occurring disorders and leave with evidence-based strategies for working with clients with dual diagnoses, including screening and assessment, techniques, and treatment planning considerations.

  • BREAKOUT: Internet Addiction and Identity Distress Among Male Adolescents and Young Adults, presented by An-Pyng Sun, PhD, LCSW, LCADC, and Hilarie Cash, PhD, LMHC, CSAT

This presentation is based on a qualitative study of eight male adolescents/young adults. With the participants’ permission, all of the in-depth interviews were recorded. The materials were transcribed and themes were identified. Results indicate a bidirectional relationship between internet addiction and identity distress. Identity distress may precede internet addiction in that the participants have experienced frustration in pursuing their career and life goals because of conflicts with reality, and internet addiction serves as a way to self-medicate. Conversely, internet addiction may occur prior to identity distress, in that the participants felt stressed about the damage their online addiction has done to their career and life goals. Implications for practice will be discussed.

  • BREAKOUT: Piecing Together an Accurate Diagnosis, presented by Kelli McCormick, LPCC-S, NCC, LCADC, MAC, and Scottiann McLain, MEd, LPCC-S

Diagnosing our clients precisely and accurately is of utmost importance in determining their course of treatment. This training will guide new and seasoned clinicians through an effective process of diagnosing, including ensuring the collection of all data needed and evaluation of the whole picture in order to develop a precise and accurate diagnosis for our clients. The importance and process of ongoing assessment and periodic updates to diagnosis will also be reviewed.

  • BREAKOUT: The Relationship Between Suicide Risk and Substance Use Disorders, presented by Alex Karydi, PhD, LMFT, LAC, CSAC

The abuse of alcohol or drugs is second to depression as the most frequent risk factor for suicidal behavior. The risks increase if substance use disorder (SUD) co-occurs with mental health disorders such as post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and some personality disorders. Those who experience depression or these other disorders can turn to drugs or alcohol as coping measures, which can evolve into SUD. This presentation will discuss the relationship between suicide risk and substance use disorders.

Practice Management & Technology

These presentations focus on the administrative, financial, ethical, operational, regulatory, and technological aspects of client care. Specific to technology, the focus will include presentations that cover new guidelines, treatment approaches, and counseling techniques to help counselors leverage technology to improve treatment.

  • KEYNOTE: Digital Literacy: Advanced Clinical Skills for Telehealth, presented by Fredrick Dombrowski, PhD, LMHC, MAC, CASAC

The clinical skills associated with telehealth are unique when compared to face-to-face sessions. Applying these skills to individuals living with co-occurring substance use and mental health diagnoses can be difficult. These difficulties can be exacerbated as many clients receiving telehealth may be living in environments where they have various factors distracting them from focusing on counseling sessions. Increased stress at home and lack of ability to focus on treatment can contribute to a client resuming substance use. Resuming substance use can then contribute to various crises. Evidence-based skills can be efficacious even under such circumstances and applied to telehealth. This presentation will enhance attendee’s clinical skills by showing examples of modification and application of evidence-based practices to telehealth. Participants will be able to identify warning signs clients may express and identify ways to navigate potential crises.

  • BREAKOUT: New Ethical Dilemmas: Developing Professional Competency in the Digital Age, presented by Wendy Woods, MA, and Nancy Roget, MS, MFT, LADC

Due to COVID-19, the use of technology and social media by behavioral health and recovery support providers has increased dramatically. Ethical practice issues like self-disclosure in postings, unintentional boundary crossings and violations, and privacy and security concerns reflect just some of the new dilemmas clinicians and peer support specialists may encounter. Adding to the problem is the previous lack of definitive guidance from existing professional and ethical codes. This presentation will address common ethical dilemmas behavioral health and peer support specialists face, including: ethics, competency, and use of technology; HIPAA and 42CRF Part II considerations for texting, email, and videoconferencing; technology issues; and applying ethical decision-making models to ethical dilemmas.

  • BREAKOUT: Techniques and Methods of Clinical Supervision, presented by Kenneth Ginlack, LCSW, CSAC, ICS

Learn methods and techniques for clinical supervision regardless of the modality used. Methods include case consultation, written activities such as verbatim and process recordings, audio and videotaping, and live observation. Techniques include modeling, skill demonstrations, and role playing. Learn the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  • BREAKOUT: Technologies Addressing Challenges to Pharmacotherapy and Treatment Monitoring in Behavioral Health, presented by Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC, and Alaina Gallagher, BS

The use of pharmacotherapy and technology is expanding in behavioral health treatment adding new alternatives specifically for SUD treatment strategies throughout the continuum of care. This expansion comes with compliance concerns regarding the use of pharmacology as well as new means for SUD professionals to monitor and support clients. This workshop will focus on identifying the current challenges associated with medication, compliance, and client monitoring by introducing proactive technology-based tools to better inform the SUD professional and improve outcomes.

  • BREAKOUT: Strategic Planning and Implementation of Techniques to Improve Business Retention and Referrals, presented by Deborah Harkness, MSC, AMFT, LAADC

This presentation includes strategic planning and implementation of techniques to improve business retention and referrals without the use of expensive traditional marketing techniques regardless of economic conditions. Constant changes to health care regulations and addition of rehabilitation focused criminal sentencing practices provide numerous opportunities for SUD providers to increase their business practices and referral resources to prevent reliance on one major source of revenue. These strategies will increase opportunities to balance your referral base and minimize financial losses with private pay and non-traditional referral resources when reductions occur with contract funding, restrictions placed on clinical care, or inclusion of costly time consuming regulations.

  • BREAKOUT: How to Start a Private Practice: Working with Court-Mandated Clients, presented by Derek Collins, MEd, CADC-II, CAMS-III, SAP

In this training, you will learn how to start and operate a profitable private practice working with court mandated clients. The presentation will cover how to use telehealth and online platforms to generate income, tips to market and advertise your business to your ideal clients, and steps to create a professional website and marketing materials for your business.

  • BREAKOUT: Virtual Services Delivery: Text Reminders to Assist in Clinical Effectiveness and Recovery, presented by Terra Hamblin, MA, NCC, BC-TMH

Helping individuals engage and remain in SUD treatment and/or recovery support services can be difficult, especially given recent public health concerns and the importance of social distancing. Text messages can be used to increase engagement, provide education, help patients manage craving and negative thoughts and moods, and achieve better treatment and recovery outcomes. This presentation will highlight a step-by-step guide to help providers use text messages to enhance their services, including: setting up a texting sequence that supports treatment flow, sending texts that are positively-framed, direct, personalized, and sound like they are from a person, ensuring the messaging strategy is compatible with legal guidelines, and using different formats for texting sequences.

  • BREAKOUT: Artificial Intelligence Innovations for Training in Peer Support and Counseling, presented by Grin Lord, PsyD, ABPP, and Nic Bertagnolli, MS

Artificial Intelligence (AI) can be used to scale the training of peer support and substance use disorder counselors. In this interactive workshop, we will learn some basic terms used in AI research, discuss AI bias, and why it matters when using AI tools for training, followed by a review of the literature and history of AI innovations in the field of substance use disorder counseling and support. Finally, we will demonstrate free tools that use AI algorithms to scale the effective training of basic listening and peer support.

  • BREAKOUT: Insurance Coverage Denials: How to Fight Back & Advance Behavioral Health Parity, presented by D. Brian Hufford, MA, JD, Caroline Reynolds, MA, JD, and Wendell Potter

Recent legal action has exposed how insurance companies are systematically and unfairly denying coverage for substance use disorder and mental health treatments. This session will provide concrete strategies that counselors, providers, and patients can use to fight back and protect their rights. Led by the lawyers behind the landmark Wit v. United Behavioral Health ruling and an insurance industry whistleblower, the presentation will review the legal landscape and discuss the tactics insurers use to limit coverage. Attendees will learn about the specific tools available to fight for the coverage they’re owed and how they can help deliver systemic change in behavioral healthcare. Recorded testimonials will provide insight from those who’ve faced illegal coverage denials.

  • BREAKOUT: Crossing the Line: Boundary Violations in Addiction Treatment, presented by William Heran, PhD, LCSW

Boundary violations with clients are very serious and can often involve law enforcement, attorneys, licensing boards, and hurt individuals. The workshop will help to identify risk factors and ways to set and respect limits in your practice. 

Cultural Humility & Social Responsibility

These presentations address current racial tensions, the impact on clinical treat¬ment, and what addiction professionals can do to provide culturally sensitive services and advocate for impacted communities.

  • KEYNOTE: The Wellbriety Movement: Cultural-Based Evaluation and Healing Strategies for Intergenerational Trauma, presented by Don Coyhis

This presentation will introduce the concept of Wellbriety as balance and connection to the natural laws that create healing within the native community. Culturally-based tools are discussed as a way for changing families. A combination of immense losses and traumatic events have perpetrated entire cultures and need healing across the nation. Wellbriety encourages the reinstatement of cultural ways, language, and sacred traditions. This presentation will address the four directions of wellness using traditional knowledge. It will explore how the Wellbriety Movement has evolved and reached its "tipping point."  Lastly, this presentation will discuss the current approach to cultural-based evaluation. In the past, we have been guided by science based evaluation but with guidance from the Elders the Wellbriety movement has shifted to include cultural and spiritual approaches to evaluation.

  • KEYNOTE: Anti-Racism in Addiction Treatment: A Searching and Fearless Moral Inventory, presented by Sarah Buino, LCSW, RDDP, CADC, CDWF, and Sarah Suzuki, LCSW, CADC

Addiction counselors increasingly work with clients who present with diverse intersectional identities. Although research documents declining life expectancy across racial groups, clinical guidelines remain silent on how to recognize and interrupt institutional racism in addiction recovery. In our current climate of increased anti-racist awareness, it is now time to take action and rehabilitate our industry. In this presentation, participants will be introduced to tools of analysis to understand, address, and interrupt white supremacy dynamics when treating substance use in outpatient and inpatient settings. Participants will conceptualize anti-racism through the lens of 12-steps, as well as a framework to illuminate how institutional pressure to maintain “white innocence” leads to poor health outcomes. 

  • BREAKOUT: Latino-Informed Therapy Across the SUD and Addiction Continuum of Care Using the SANITY Model, presented by Frank Lemus, Sr., PhD, MFT

Latinos suffering from SUD and addiction are in need of professionals skilled in creating Latino-informed therapeutic environments facilitating awareness, intervention, assessment, referral, treatment, and recovery support. This session is organized around the SANITY model of clinical practice using a Latino-informed approach keyed to the values, morals, and ethics that are particularly salient for Latinos. The SANITY model describes six domains within the therapeutic environment including: safety, acceptance, nurturance, importance, trust, and “YES” (affirming a net positive for a client’s overall recovery and life satisfaction.) The session provides an opportunity for in-depth learning and discussion of each SANITY domain and how to integrate these in clinical settings with Latino clients.

  • BREAKOUT: Ethnicity: The Other Co-occurring Factor in Treating SUD and Mental Health Issues, presented by Valerie Daniel, PhD, LCSW

Ethnic minorities make up 13.3% of the co-occurring group of people dealing with SUD and mental health issues. Research shows that ethnicity plays a factor in when, how, or if they seek treatment as well as the utilization of treatment. Treatment modalities have been primarily based on the other 86.7% of the population. Understanding how ethnicity affects interactions with the mental health and substance use worlds is paramount if long lasting change and recovery is to be achieved. Post traumatic slave syndrome, intergenerational trauma, and the biopsychosocial perspective can be used to develop more targeted, empirically-based approaches to treatment that will improve long term outcomes and provide service providers with a more empathetic foundation to work from.

  • BREAKOUT: Treating the BIPOC Community Through the Lens of Cultural Humility, presented by Zina Rodriguez, MSW, CDE

Cultural humility is not just the acceptance of cultural differences, but rather a transformational process that allows individuals to acknowledge interdependence and align with a group other than their own. Cultural humility involves ongoing self-exploration and the use of a patient's language and culture as tools to improve outcomes for that individual. This workshop will provide an overview of the prevalent issues impacting mental health and substance use disorders among minority communities, present information to help programs and providers to understand cultural issues relevant to treating persons of color, and examine how individuals and programs can increase access and provide treatment that is culturally relevant to clients.

  • BREAKOUT: Diversity, Inclusion, and Intersectionality: Holding Space for All Sexual Minorities, presented by Philip T. McCabe CSW, CAS, CDVC

The LGBTQ+ community is very diversified in their history, experience, and even identification. Many studies and theories speak to the importance of having cultural humility and being culturally competent when treating individuals from this community. Now that the national mental health system has pivoted to accommodate telehealth services over the past year, what aspects of cultural competency have been “lost in translation”? This workshop will include an overview of more common issues for this community, especially during the pandemic, including coming out, gender dysphoria, substance use, sexual health issues, and the impact of the pandemic. It will also address how their allies can foster a positive interconnection to increase positive health outcomes and recovery from substance misuse.

  • BREAKOUT: SUD Prevention Program for Transracially Adopted Children and Adolescents, presented by Lisa Ellis, MA, LAC, LCADC, Sunanda “Suni” Sharma, LAC, NCC, and Rebecca Randall, LPC, LMHC

The prevalence of substance use among adoptees is higher than that of non-adopted persons, and several pre- and post-adoption factors (e.g., attachment, trauma, racial/cultural identity concerns) position transracial adoptees (TRAs) to be at higher risk to develop SUDs. In this presentation, we describe our proposed prevention program for transracial adoptive families as there are presently no specialized treatment modalities for this underserved population. Strengthening Transracial Adoptive Families (STAF) utilizes the Guiding Good Choices (GGC) prevention program as its foundation to integrate a culturally responsive adoption curriculum to best serve transracial adoptive families.

  • BREAKOUT: African American Federation of Recovery Organizations (AAFRO): Our History and Our Purpose, presented by David Whiters, PhD, LCSW, MAC, NCPRSS

AAFRO is a federation of African Americans with multiple years of experience developing, leading, and sustaining recovery community organizations (RCO). Our presentation will detail our rationale for forming, our formulation process, and our challenges and successes.

  • BREAKOUT: Substance Use Within the Context of Human Trafficking, presented by Claire Openshaw, PhD, LCPC

Human trafficking refers to the exploitation of an individual using force, fraud, or coercion. Substance use disorders exacerbate an individual's vulnerability to being trafficked because traffickers can exploit their dependency. Traffickers also use substances as a means of coercion to get victims to comply with their demands, increase productivity, inhibit self-protection, decrease escape attempts, and continue entrapment. Victims may also engage in substance use as a means of coping with their unfathomable trauma. Additionally, many victims are forced to engage in criminality such as illicit drug production and transportation, which may lead to involvement with the criminal justice system. Overall, these factors increase the probability of trafficked persons remaining entrapped.

  • BREAKOUT: The Impact of Racial Trauma on Mental Health and Recovery, presented by Devona Stalnaker-Shofner, EdD, LPC, NCC, and Jamian Coleman, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC

Racial and social justice have been at the fore of mental health due to societal movements related to recent anti-Blackness injustices. These injustices have exposed the historical and current racial trauma experienced by Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). This presentation focuses on understanding racial trauma as a component of mental health and an element of recovery.

  • BREAKOUT: Working Effectively with African American Clients in SUD Treatment, presented by Roland Williams, MA, MAC, CAADC, LAADC

This interactive and dynamic presentation will first challenge participants to acknowledge the severity and impact of racism and oppression African Americans have historically faced in this society. We will discuss how this injustice has influenced the cultural, social, legal, psychological, educational, and spiritual development of this population. We will explore how addiction has permeated the Black community and the additional toll it’s taken on the culture. Participants will have an opportunity to consider their own personal experiences with racism and be able to identify their own bias and prejudices. We will examine how the addiction treatment community has responded to African American clients and offer some practical solutions as well as specific counseling strategies that will improve treatment outcomes and client retention rates. We will review a list of relapse warning signs for African Americans and identify the components of a culturally-sophisticated recovery plan. We will also discuss the impact on the Black community and the treatment industry of the disproportionately high number of African Americans incarcerated for drug-related crimes and those mandated into treatment. We will approach these issues in a solution-oriented, proactive manner that seeks to empower and encourage the clients and participants.

Peer Recovery Support

These presentations cover critical issues for the peer recovery support specialist.

  • PANEL DISCUSSION: The Future of the Peer Recovery Movement Panel, presented by Honesty Liller, CPRS, Joe Powell, LCPC, Helen "Skip" Skipper, Kyle Brewer, BS, PRPS, and John Cates, MA, LCDC

Peer support services are an important part of the treatment and recovery process. While peer services in recovery is not a new concept, the discipline of peer specialists has become a rapidly growing sector within the addiction profession. With rapid growth comes many opportunities to reflect, evaluate and course correct to ensure alignment with the ideals of the peer recovery movement. This presentation and panel will focus on lessons learned that will be shared from experienced pioneers in the recovery movement. Additionally, the panel will Identify key priorities to help advance the peer recovery support workforce.

  • BREAKOUT: Introduction to Holistic Integrative Treatment and Recovery, presented by Reynelda Jones LMSW-C, CAADC, ADS, CMHIMP

There has been a emphasis on integrating Eastern medicinal approaches to treat co-occurring disorders and substance use disorders. This workshop will prompt participants to learn about holistic integrative therapies as a complementary treatment to clients in recovery. Participants will learn the definition of holistic integrative therapies and the treatment modalities' impact on the whole person. Participants will explore the research and case studies demonstrating the effectiveness of holistic integrative methods. Participants will be able to learn basic skills that can promote a client’s autonomy in recovery.

  • BREAKOUT: The Power of Recovery Narratives, presented by Therissa Libby, PhD

Public narratives of addiction are everywhere, while those of recovery are few. The Recovery Narratives Project collects recovery stories and uses them as the basis of both qualitative inquiry and an online archive. This workshop is an exploration of the common themes found in 42 recovery stories and reflects on stories recently collected in other countries.

  • BREAKOUT: Families, Trauma, & Addiction: Insights from Medical Family Therapy and Treatment of Chronic Disease, presented by Michael Barnes, PhD, MAC, LPC

What would happen to our treatment outcomes if we were to really treat addiction like the chronic disease that we say it is? This presentation will apply lessons learned from how chronic disease is treated in integrated medical environments through the lens of medical family therapy and through the lens of transgenerational and family system trauma theory. The goal will be for attendees to consider the need for a paradigm shift in how families are incorporated into the addiction treatment process. Attendees will learn about the phases of the chronic disease model and the developmental tasks for families in each phase. Dr. Barnes will discuss implications and briefly introduce a family system, a family-centered clinical program for treating families who are struggling with addiction.

  • BREAKOUT: CRAFT Connect: Engaging Families in Recovery of Loved Ones from Behavioral Health Disorders, presented by John Garbett, MS, MFA, ASUDC, CRAFT Certified Clinician

Families, parents, spouses, siblings, and other concerned significant others (CSOs) are crucial and too often excluded collaborators in their loved one’s recovery from mental health and substance use disorders. CSO engagement and involvement can be key to recovery for individuals with these conditions. Well-supported scientific evidence shows that when practitioners, people in recovery, and their families work collaboratively, clinical outcomes and quality of life often improve. This workshop includes an overview of the importance of CSOs in recovery, an introduction to models of engagement including the peer-to-peer CRAFT Connect experience that can be immediately incorporated into their practice.

  • BREAKOUT: The Silent Wounds in Recovery, presented by Katina Palmer, LPC, MA, ORDM, MHFAI

The road to recovery is an unpredictable exchange between the individual in recovery and society. Along this road are signs or mile markers which may indicate the necessity for change. It is these identifiers that oftentimes produce incongruent feelings within individuals in recovery. As a result, the person in recovery may go through stages of grief, loss, and/or stages of change. These pivotal moments are opportunities to encourage authentic change by addressing the silent expectations of the individual in recovery. Helping individuals to identify and address their silent expectations will champion change in the recovery process.

  • BREAKOUT: Emotional Sobriety: "Step One" Meets (Any) Experiential Psychotherapy, presented by George DuWors, MSW, LICSW, BCD, MAC

Bill Wilson’s article on emotional sobriety intimately recounts his suffering, struggle, realization, effort, and relief. What tools did he use to confront his depression? What did he realize? How did that help? What conclusions did Bill reach? Can we take this understanding even further for using the 12-steps themselves for emotional sobriety, not just building a rationale for psychotherapy? If so, how might counselors support those already “working the program” in their self-help for problems beyond abstinence? Finally, might this understanding give us a direct way to enhance counseling itself, regardless of modality? The presenter will use both personal and clinical examples to answer these questions. Audience experience and questions will be welcome.

  • BREAKOUT: Internal Family System, COVID-19, and Treating the Hidden Client: The Relapsed Clinician, presented by Candice Richardson Dickens, LCADC, LCPC, MAC

Overnight the COVID-19 pandemic changed the landscape of the addiction community because most recovery community support groups were pushed online. Counseling services were replaced overnight by telehealth platforms. The direct relationship connection that often forms the basis of recovery was negatively impacted by long periods of isolation, loneliness, and feelings of powerlessness. The objective of this workshop will be to teach workshop attendees on how to use Internal Family System to help their clients manage their negative emotions and return them to their highest level of functioning and sobriety.

  • BREAKOUT: Positivity-Focused & Strengths-Based Techniques to Support Long-Term Recovery, presented by Garret Biss, CPRC, CAPP, USMC (Ret.), MRED

In early recovery, it’s common to focus on eliminating everything “bad” from an individual’s life and character. While a great first step, a defects-focused, elimination approach can only take one so far in their recovery journey. Learning to focus on one’s past wins, successes, and innate strengths is a vital step that raises the bar of expectations for recovery and increases the levels of happiness, fulfillment, joy, and success. Influenced by the science of human flourishing, this presentation shares techniques to help people in recovery to move “north of neutral” and into their higher-level potential. This presentation will empower participants with new tools for improving the lives of friends, clients, and colleagues who are seeking successful, long-term recovery.

  • BREAKOUT: Mindfulness Practices for Supporting Addiction Recovery, presented by Kathryn Shafer, PhD, LCSW, CAP, E-IAYT

Mindfulness practices offer a compassionate approach on how to enjoy the sober presence of non-judgmental awareness. An overview of practical meditations and exercises discusses how to integrate evidence based mindfulness-based sobriety and trauma informed practices into diverse clinical settings. Participants explore beliefs that trigger craving and create a calm mindset by practicing self-regulation skills to ride out waves of sensation. Utilizing the concepts of talk, EMDR, and yoga therapies, best practices will be shared by the raw data collected from the presenter.

Advanced SUD Treatment Skills

These presentations include focused spe¬cialization and application of evidence-based practices and treatment approaches that advance addiction and recovery.

  • KEYNOTE: Cannabis-Induced Psychosis, presented by Sherrá Watkins, PhD, LCMHC-S, LCAS, CRC

Evidence for an association between cannabis and psychosis has been documented in literature in many forms, including experimental studies, epidemiological data, and case series. The association has implications for psychotic outcomes ranging from mild to severe and occurring over minutes to years. Cannabis use carries certain mental health risk, particularly for individuals with a personal or family history of mental illness and for those who use it frequently. Estimates indicated that people who use cannabis have a 40% higher risk of psychosis than those who do not use this substance. But who's at risk? This workshop will discuss how this issue is impacting the Black community.

  • BREAKOUT: A Novel Application of Neuro and Behavioral Science in SUD, presented by Chris Ashton, BEng, MD, MBA, CE (Harvard), and Denise Duffie, BBA, MBA, CE (Stanford)

Findings in neuroscience over the past 15 years have clearly shown that addiction is a brain disorder, with similar findings characteristic to all those who suffer from it. Nonetheless, clinicians working in addiction treatment rarely incorporate neuroscience-informed approaches into their practice. We embarked on a novel residential program design that employed rigorous sources from the academic literature, based on a framework of robust neuroscience matched with behavioral science, tailored to individual life experience. This presentation outlines our approach, successes, and lessons learned. This is illustrated through a case study of a client who attended and followed up with our program.

  • BREAKOUT: The Impact of COVID-19 on the Opioid Epidemic: What's Next for Clinicians?, presented by Lakieshia Jones, MS, CADC II, ICADC, SAP, and Bridget Rivera, PsyD, MAC

In 2020, the nation was introduced to the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, addiction professionals were already grappling with the opioid epidemic. Now in 2021, the pandemic and its consequences haven't gone away. In this session Mrs. Jones and Dr. Rivera will talk about the shift of how opioid use disorder treatment will look for clients and for addiction professionals that provide services.

  • BREAKOUT: Non-Pharmaceutical, Non-Invasive Medical Innovation for Treatment of SUD and Addiction, presented by Judi Kosterman, EdD, and Jordan Scott, Neuro Tech

Updating participants about the medical science of neuromodulation and its direct use in treating substance use and comorbid mental health disorders, we will discuss developments in the science and advancement now used in traditional inpatient and outpatient SUD and addiction treatment. We will describe the specific protocol, share emerging data, hear from patients and counselors, and discuss integration of this treatment in effective behavioral health infrastructure. Progress with third-party payers (private insurers, self-insured groups and Medicaid) will be reported. Not intended to displace or disrupt evidence-based SUD and addiction treatment, EMBP brings effective non-pharma, non-invasive, medical innovation to behavioral health therapies resulting in the most effective treatment.

  • BREAKOUT: FDA Regulation of Products From the Opium Poppy: From Prescription Opioids to Poppy Seeds, presented by Peter Lurie, MD, MPH, Eva Greenthal, MS, MPH, Suzanne Doyon, MD, and Steve and Betty Hacala

This presentation will include an overview of FDA’s regulation of opioids, including a historical review of drug approval standards and the post-marketing risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) program. It also will alert addiction professionals to the use of and risks associated with poppy seed tea (PST). “Unwashed” poppy seeds containing therapeutic levels of morphine are available for legal purchase online. Users of PST brew large amounts of poppy seeds into tea for the purpose of intoxication or claimed health benefits including treatment of pain, anxiety, and withdrawal. At least 20 non-fatal overdoses, 19 deaths, and several cases of dependence from PST have been reported in the U.S. and evidence to be reviewed in this presentation suggests use of PST may be on the rise.

  • BREAKOUT: Integrating Affective Neuroscience with Best Practices of Recovery Treatment, presented by Michael Galloway, MA, LMHC, SUDP, MAC

Current neurological research by Schore, Siegel, Damasio, Panksepp, Porges, and others, demonstrates that behavioral change comes through sustained forms of self-regulation. This workshop examines emotional regulation as the keystone feature of “working a personal program of recovery” espoused by leaders in addiction research such as Nora Volkow, George Koob, and William White. Participants explore an integrated schema of recovery that is informed by subcortical brain systems—embodied emotional affects—which play determinate roles for making sustainable cognitive and behavioral changes. This workshop introduces therapeutic tools applicable to mental health, substance use disorder, and co-occurring problems like depression, anxiety, and trauma applicable to adolescent and adult treatment. 

  • BREAKOUT: Counselors as Shapeshifters: 21st Century Cannabis Treatment and Training, presented by Vanessa Alleyne, PhD, and Lisa Ellis, MA, LPC, LCADC

At the close of 2020, 36 states in America had legalized the use of medical marijuana, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Another 15 states and the District of Columbia have legalized small amounts for adult recreational use. A year ago, the Pew Research Center reported that 2/3 of Americans favor cannabis legalization. This statistic is the polar opposite of just 20 years ago, when 63% of the country said that cannabis should be illegal. While we are still coping with the opioid crisis, vaping, and other serious substance use challenges, is there a vision to reorient counselor training to address the altered state of cannabis use? How will the field respond to the new cultural hegemony?

  • BREAKOUT: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Recovery: Advocating for the Dignity of MAT Recipients, presented by Danielle H. Johnson, LCPC, CAC-AD, NCC, and Rebecca Belton, LPC

This presentation will illustrate the challenges experienced by individuals receiving medication-assisted treatment (MAT).  Although decades of research indicate MAT’s effectiveness, work is needed to eliminate stigma and increase treatment access (SAMHSA, 2012). This presentation seeks to examine the systemic practices that exasperate stigma and shame and identifies ways practitioners can advocate for MAT participants. The presentation will utilize case studies to combine experiences and propose solutions. Participants will use the theory of change framework (2004) to create new advocacy-centered strategies.

  • BREAKOUT: Evidenced-Based Practices to Treating Stimulant Disorders, presented by Trish Caldwell MFT, LPC, CCDP-D, CAADC

Abuse of stimulants like methamphetamine, cocaine, and even prescription drugs like Adderall and Ritalin is surging across the country, fed by cheap, potent, and plentiful supplies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported that overdose deaths have more than tripled for cocaine and quadrupled for methamphetamine since 2012. Current national and local data show dramatic increases in the number of first-time users of cocaine and meth, as well as a significant surge in availability just as the availability of opioids has been decreasing. With this increasing need for evidence-based treatment, this training will explore the current trends of stimulant use explore the need for a call to action in mainstreaming clear guidelines on creating uniformed evidenced based practices.

  • BREAKOUT: Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Chronic Pain, presented by Allen Hume, PhD, SUDP, MAC

The purpose of this workshop is to provide clinicians with a brief overview and understanding of acute versus chronic pain, how pain impacts an individual’s psychosocial functioning, and how it can inhibit recovery. Practical interventions will be provided that focus on CBT, coping skills development, and self-regulation strategies.


Full Schedule

Please note session times may be subject to change. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.
Full session descriptions are listed in track information above.

Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 22.5 CEs

10:00AM – 11:00AM ET exhibitors and poster sessions open

Visit our Virtual Exhibit Hall, Poster Presentations, or network!

11:00Am – 12:00pm ET OPENING SESSION (1 CE)

Welcome & State of NAADAC, presented by Cynthia Moreno Tuohy, BSW, NCAC II, CDC III, SAP, and Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LAC, MAC, SAP

12:00pm – 1:00pm ET KEYNOTE SESSION (1 CE)

Cannabis-Induced Psychosis, presented by Sherrá Watkins, PhD, LCMHC-S, LCAS, CRC

1:00pm – 1:30pm ET Exhibit Hall BREAK
Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!
1:30pm – 2:30pm ET BREAKOUT SESSIONS (1 CE each)
  • Counseling in Addiction: The Impact of Narrative Digital Storytelling & the Process of Change, presented by Toni F. Monroe, MS, APC, NCAC II, IC&RC
     
  • Dissociation: The Hidden Co-occurring Disorder, presented by Roseann Lynch, LPC, NCC, RPT, CDC I
     
  • New Ethical Dilemmas: Developing Professional Competency in the Digital Age, presented by Wendy Woods, MA, and Nancy Roget, MS, MFT, LADC
     
  • Latino-Informed Therapy Across the SUD and Addiction Continuum of Care Using the SANITY Model, presented by Frank Lemus, Sr., PhD, MFT
     
  • Introduction to Holistic Integrative Treatment and Recovery, presented by Reynelda Jones LMSW-C, CAADC, ADS, CMHIMP
     
  • A Novel Application of Neuro and Behavioral Science in SUD, presented by Chris Ashton, BEng, MD, MBA, CE (Harvard), and Denise Duffie, BBA, MBA, CE (Stanford)
2:30pm – 3:00pm ET Exhibit Hall BREAK
Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!
3:00pm – 4:00pm ET BREAKOUT SESSIONS (1 CE each)
  • A Positive Approach to Relapse Prevention, presented by Gary Blanchard, MA, LADC I, MA-PGS
     
  • Don’t Judge a Brain by Its Cover: Understanding Co-occurring Brain Injury & Substance Use Disorders, presented by Stephanie Huhn, MA, LLP, CBIS, CAADC, and Colin King, PhD, LP, CAADC
     
  • Techniques and Methods of Clinical Supervision, presented by Kenneth Ginlack, LCSW, CSAC, ICS
     
  • Ethnicity: The Other Co-occurring Factor in Treating SUD and Mental Health Issues, presented by Valerie Daniel, PhD, LCSW
     
  • The Power of Recovery Narratives, presented by Therissa Libby, PhD
     
  • The Impact of COVID-19 on the Opioid Epidemic: What's Next for Clinicians?, presented by Lakieshia Jones, MS, CADC II, ICADC, SAP, and Bridget Rivera, PsyD, MAC
4:00pm – 4:30pm ET exhibit HALL break
Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!
4:30pm – 5:30pm ET breakout sessions (1 CE each)
  • Acute Critical Incident Desensitization, presented by Larisa Traga, LCSW, MAC, CCDS
     
  • When They Can't Unplug: Understanding Video Game Addiction in Adolescents, presented by Thad Shunkwiler, LMFT, LPCC, CCMHC, ACS
     
  • Technologies Addressing Challenges to Pharmacotherapy and Treatment Monitoring in Behavioral Health, presented by Jerry A. Jenkins, MEd, LADAC, MAC, and Alaina Gallagher, BS
     
  • Treating the BIPOC Community Through the Lens of Cultural Humility, presented by Zina Rodriguez, MSW, CDE
     
  • Families, Trauma, & Addiction: Insights from Medical Family Therapy and Treatment of Chronic Disease, presented by Michael Barnes, PhD, MAC, LPC
     
  • Non-Pharmaceutical, Non-Invasive Medical Innovation for Treatment of SUD and Addiction, presented by Judi Kosterman, EdD, and Jordan Scott, Neuro Tech
5:30pm – 6:00pm ET exhibit HALL break

Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!

6:00Pm – 7:00pm ET KEYNOTE SESSION (1 CE)

Digital Literacy: Advanced Clinical Skills for Telehealth, presented by Fredrick Dombrowski, PhD, LMHC, MAC, CASAC

7:00pm – 7:30pm ET exhibit HALL break

Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!

7:30PM – 9:00PM ET Panel discussion (1.5 ces)

Trauma, Grief, and Resiliency Panel, presented by Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, Geoff Wilson, LCSW, LCADC, Tian Dayton, PhD, and Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LAC, MAC, SAP

Friday, October 29, 2021 - 21.5 CEs

10:00AM – 11:00AM et exhibitors and poster sessions open

Visit our Virtual Exhibit Hall, Poster Presentations, or network!

11:00am – 12:00pm ET KEYNOTE SESSION (1 CE)

SOCIOMETRICS: Resilience Building Processes in Working with Trauma and Addiction, presented by Tian Dayton, PhD

12:00pm – 12:30pm ET Exhibit Hall BREAK
Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!
12:30pm – 1:30pm ET BREAKOUT SESSIONS (1 CE each)
  • Integrating Harm Reduction Strategies into Your Practice, presented by Kimberly May, LPC-S, LMFT
     
  • People Like Me: Working with Vulnerable Populations Using an Integrated Model to Behavioral Health, presented by Sheryl Neverson, PhD, LCSW-C, LICSW
     
  • Strategic Planning and Implementation of Techniques to Improve Business Retention and Referrals, presented by Deborah Harkness, MSC, AMFT, LAADC
     
  • Diversity, Inclusion, and Intersectionality: Holding Space for All Sexual Minorities, presented by Philip T. McCabe CSW, CAS, CDVC
     
  • CRAFT Connect: Engaging Families in Recovery of Loved Ones from Behavioral Health Disorders, presented by John Garbett, MS, MFA, ASUDC, CRAFT Certified Clinician
     
  • FDA Regulation of Products from the Opium Poppy: From Prescription Opioids to Poppy Seeds, presented by Peter Lurie, MD, MPH, Eva Greenthal, MS, MPH, Suzanne Doyon, MD, and Steve and Betty Hacala
1:30pm – 2:00pm ET Exhibit Hall BREAK
Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET BREAKOUT SESSIONS (1 CE each)
  • Finding the ASAM Golden Thread, presented by Richard Whittington, MA, SUDP
     
  • Beyond Integrated Care, presented by Melinda Drake, LISW CP & AP, LCSW
     
  • How to Start a Private Practice: Working with Court-Mandated Clients, presented by Derek Collins, MEd, CADC-II, CAMS-III, SAP
      
  • SUD Prevention Program for Transracially Adopted Children and Adolescents, presented by Lisa Ellis, MA, LAC, LCADC, Sunanda “Suni” Sharma, LAC, NCC, and Rebecca Randall, LPC, LMHC
     
  • The Silent Wounds in Recovery, presented by Katina Palmer, LPC, MA, ORDM, MHFAI
     
  •  Integrating Affective Neuroscience with Best Practices of Recovery Treatment, presented by Michael Galloway, MA, LMHC, SUDP, MAC
3:00pm – 3:30pm ET Exhibit Hall BREAK
Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!
3:30pm – 4:30pm ET breakout sessions (1 CE each)
  • Practitioner’s Guide for Using Reality Therapy with Difficult Clients, presented by Robert Wubbolding, EdD, LPCC, CRT
     
  • Counseling Through the Co-occurring Conundrum: Demystifying Treatment of Dual Diagnoses, presented by Jessica A. Love Jordan-Banks, MHS, LPC, CADC
     
  • Virtual Services Delivery: Text Reminders to Assist in Clinical Effectiveness and Recovery, presented by Terra Hamblin, MA, NCC, BC-TMH
     
  • African American Federation of Recovery Organizations (AAFRO): Our History and Our Purpose, presented by David Whiters, PhD, LCSW, MAC, NCPRSS
     
  • Emotional Sobriety: "Step One" Meets (Any) Experiential Psychotherapy, presented by George DuWors, MSW, LICSW, BCD, MAC
     
  • Counselors as Shapeshifters: 21st Century Cannabis Treatment and Training, presented by Vanessa Alleyne, PhD, and Lisa Ellis, MA, LPC, LCADC
4:30pm – 5:00pm ET EXHIBIT HALL BREAK
Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!
5:00pm – 6:00pm ET keynote session (1 ce)

Alcohol Recovery Medicine: Making Alcoholism Uncommon, presented by John Umhau, MD, MPH, CPE

6:00pm – 6:30pm ET EXHIBIT HALL BREAK

Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!

6:30pm – 7:00pm ET live vendor showcase
7:00pm – 8:30pm ET panel discussion (1.5 ces)

The Future of the Peer Recovery Movement Panel, presented by Honesty Liller, CPRS, Joe Powell, LCPC, Helen "Skip" Skipper, Kyle Brewer, BS, PRPS, and John Cates, MA, LCDC

 

Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 21.5 CEs

10:00am – 11:00Am ET exhibitors and poster sessions open

Visit our Virtual Exhibit Hall, Poster Presentations, or network!

10:00am – 11:00am ET LEADERSHIP Q&A (1 CE)

Q&A with NAADAC & NCC AP Leadership, with Cynthia Moreno Tuohy, BSW, NCAC II, CDC III, SAP, Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LAC, MAC, SAP, and James "Kansas" Cafferty, LMFT, NCAAC, MAC

11:00am – 12:00pm ET KEYNOTE SESSION (1 CE)

Anti-Racism in Addiction Treatment: A Searching and Fearless Moral Inventory, presented by Sarah Buino, LCSW, RDDP, CADC, CDWF, and Sarah Suzuki, LCSW, CADC

12:00pm – 12:30pm ET Exhibit Hall BREAK
Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!
12:30pm – 1:30pm ET BREAKOUT SESSIONS (1 CE each)
  • Preventing Suicide Death in Substance Use Treatment Settings: Applying the Zero Suicide Framework, presented by Shelby Kuhn, MSW, LCSW, SAC
     
  • Internet Addiction and Identity Distress Among Male Adolescents and Young Adults, presented by An-Pyng Sun, PhD, LCSW, LCADC, and Hilarie Cash, PhD, LMHC, CSAT
     
  • Artificial Intelligence Innovations for Training in Peer Support and Counseling, presented by Grin Lord, PsyD, ABPP, and Nic Bertagnolli, MS

  • Substance Use Within the Context of Human Trafficking, presented by Claire Openshaw, PhD, LCPC
     
  • Internal Family System, COVID-19, and Treating the Hidden Client: The Relapsed Clinician, presented by Candice Richardson Dickens, LCADC, LCPC, MAC
     
  • Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Recovery: Advocating for the Dignity of MAT Recipients, presented by Danielle H. Johnson, LCPC, CAC-AD, NCC, and Rebecca Belton, LPC
1:30pm – 2:00pm ET Exhibit Hall BREAK
Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET breakout sessions (1 CE each)
  • Dos, Don'ts, and How tos: Best Practices in Group Facilitation, presented by Ryan Wells, ACS, CADC-II, MSCJ, MDiv

  • Piecing Together an Accurate Diagnosis, presented by Kelli McCormick, LPCC-S, NCC, LCADC, MAC, and Scottiann McLain, MEd, LPCC-S

  • Insurance Coverage Denials: How to Fight Back & Advance Behavioral Health Parity, presented by D. Brian Hufford, MA, JD, Caroline Reynolds, MA, JD, and Wendell Potter

  • The Impact of Racial Trauma on Mental Health and Recovery, presented by Devona Stalnaker-Shofner, EdD, LPC, NCC, and Jamian Coleman, MS, LPC, CRC, NCC

  • Positivity-Focused & Strengths-Based Techniques to Support Long-Term Recovery, presented by Garret Biss, CPRC, CAPP, USMC (Ret.), MRED

  • Evidenced-Based Practices to Treating Stimulant Disorders, presented by Trish Caldwell MFT, LPC, CCDP-D, CAADC

3:00pm – 3:30pm ET Exhibit Hall BREAK

Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!

3:30pm – 4:30pm ET breakout sessions (1 CE each)
  • Flourish in Recovery, presented by Jason Powers, MD, MAPP
     
  • The Relationship Between Suicide Risk and Substance Use Disorders, presented by Alex Karydi, PhD, LMFT, LAC, CSAC
     
  • Crossing the Line: Boundary Violations in Addiction Treatment, presented by William Heran, PhD, LCSW
     
  • Working Effectively with African American Clients in SUD Treatment, presented by Roland Williams, MA, MAC, CAADC, LAADC
     
  • Mindfulness Practices for Supporting Addiction Recovery, presented by Kathryn Shafer, PhD, LCSW, CAP, E-IAYT
     
  • Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Chronic Pain, presented by Allen Hume, PhD, SUDP, MAC
4:30pm – 5:00pm ET Exhibit Hall BREAK

Take a break, visit our virtual Exhibit Hall, or network!

5:00pm – 6:00pm ET keynote session (1 ce)

The Wellbriety Movement: Cultural-Based Evaluation and Healing Strategies for Intergenerational Trauma, presented by Don Coyhis

6:00pm – 6:30pm ET closing ceremony (0.5 ces)

Looking Towards 2022 & NAADAC's 50th Anniversary, with Cynthia Moreno Tuohy, BSW, NCAC II, CDC III, SAP, and Mita M. Johnson, EdD, LAC, MAC, SAP, with a special musical presentation by Grady Anthony Austin